This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
I


n the wake of 9/11, interoperability has be- come a top priority in the public safety and justice communities. Due to the challenges faced by police departments and EMS units on 9/11, the 9/11 Com- mission mandated that interoperable communications networks be implemented across the country. Nearly 15 years later, many agencies and vendors still do not understand how interoperability works and how to effectively implement it. More than that, there are a number of questions that the concept of interoperability brings. For instance, how is in- formation actually shared from a technological standpoint? How is the information shared between two systems or two actors?


Interoperability is especially important in the public safety industry. If core technology systems aren’t working in uni- son, response times and effi cacy can be impacted. Interop- erability has become absolutely critical for public safety agencies to stay ahead of the unique dangers that the 21st century brings.


So what exactly is interoperability? Interoperability means that different systems can communicate with one another, exchange information, and process shared data. Similar data formats, communication protocols, and standards are all in- tegral to ensure two systems are interoperable. Beyond being transmittable, data must be accurate and useful, and it must be sensible and usable for parties on either end of the system. A record entered on one endpoint in a Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) system must be accessible, and sensible, from a different endpoint along an interoperable CAD sys- tem. Or a single user of an interoperable records manage- ment system (RMS) must be able to search for information across all linked RMSes for the system to be considered truly interoperable.


The key to understanding interoperability rests in under- standing how it can provide a fuller and more accurate picture of an individual, setting, case or situation. By allowing for infor- mation from multiple sources to be combined, shared and ana- lyzed from different points of view, interoperability helps fa- cilitate a shared understanding among individuals from differ- ent agencies or jurisdictions. Multiple individuals can add necessary perspective and in- sights that can further opera- tional goals. The “real-world value” of such information scales, so the more parties that


can have access to an interoperable system, the more valuable and accurate it becomes. Here are three tips for agencies to consider when tackling interoperability:


EASY. AFFORDABLE. PROVEN.


Manage daily rosters and schedules (DVLO\ WUDFN DQG PDQDJH HPSOR\HH FHUWLĆFDWLRQV DQG WUDLQLQJ Online time-off requests Build rotations 0RQLWRU VWDIĆQJ OHYHOV Send email and text messages


FREE 30-DAY TRIAL


ScheduleAnywhere.com/OFFICER CALL US: 800.874.8801


http://info.hotims.com/59440-13 www.lawandordermag.com 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68