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the addition of an easily-accessed berth with a 10m water depth and the ability to accommodate vessels up to 180m in length, along with a working area of 16,000 square metres, including heavy lift and module skidding capabilities, and full quayside servicing. Plans have now been unveiled for a


further £47million investment at the harbour to ensure it remains at the forefront of the fishing industry for the remainder of the 21st century. A larger fish market with 50% greater floor space is planned whilst the inner harbours will be deepened to 6.5m which will allow vessels unrestricted access and berthing in safe, weather-protected basins. The works will also provide 50,000


square metres of space targeted at the emerging oil and gas decommissioning sector, recognising the opportunities around decommissioning activity as North Sea assets come to the end of their life. Increased berthing space will also allow larger offshore supply and maintenance vessels access the harbour. Proposals drawn up by Peterhead Port


Authority will develop the facility into a fully integrated, state-of-the-art hub by the middle of 2017. At the north of the corridor, Statoil plan


to build the first floating wind farm, off the Scottish coast. The Hywind Scotland Pilot Park will be located near Buchan Deep, approx. 28 km off the coast of Peterhead. Peterhead will provide an operation and maintenance base for the project. The 30 MW pilot project will consist of


five, 6 MW floating turbines operating in waters exceeding 100m of depth. The Pilot Park objectives are to demonstrate cost efficient and low risk solutions for commercial scale parks. The project will upscale technology that has been tried and tested in a single turbine layout off the Norwegian coast to a full scale wind park. This pilot project is expected to


demonstrate the feasibility of multiple floating wind turbines in a location that


Aberdeen Energy & Innovation Parks


has optimal wind conditions, access to a skilled supply chain and supportive regulatory framework. Floating wind represents a new and


significant renewable energy source that will complement an existing and expanding array of alternative energy projects. The North East of Scotland is proving to be the location of choice to test and develop innovative energy and other low carbon projects.


Business Parks & Developments Within the Energetica corridor there are eight business parks hosting a range of opportunities for businesses of all sizes, with a ninth park also coming forward. The Aberdeen Energy & Innovation Parks,


forms the most southern gateway to Energetica, and is home to over 80 businesses, including Aberdeen & Grampian Chamber of Commerce, and Elevator UK. In total, the Parks comprise 200,000 square ft of multi-let office and industrial accommodation for over 80 companies and a workforce of nearly 2,000 employees. Acquired by Moorfield Group in 2014, a


joint venture with Buccleuch Property will see approximately 60 acres of expansion land across the parks being developed. The Core is a 100 acre business park


offering high quality and bespoke office, industrial, workshop, warehouse and leisure facilities which lies just to the north of Aberdeen Energy Parks. It plays a key role in attracting investment and new business to Energetica, with an aim to be one of the UK’s most energy efficient, low carbon business communities. In February 2016, Scottish Minister for


Business Fergus Ewing attended a ground breaking ceremony for a new £4million inspection and testing facility created by oil and gas service company Sonomatic, at The Core. Sonomatic is a market leader in the development and provision of automated non-destructive (NDT) ultrasonic inspection and related integrity services for the oil and gas, power generation and defence sectors. Land at Blackdogwas allocated for


Supply vessel at Peterhead COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MONTHLY 2016


development in the Aberdeenshire Local Development Plan (LDP) for 600 houses


35


and 11 hectares of employment land. Blackdog lies at the junction of the


northern leg of the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route (AWPR) and the A90 Aberdeen and Peterhead road so provides an accessible and attractive location for a mixed-use development that will act as a gateway to the south of the Energetica corridor. Local house builder Kirkwood Homes and commercial developer Ashfield Land will deliver the project. Whilst the majority of the project will


be delivered after the new AWPR junction at Blackdog is completed, the first phase was granted planning permission in November 2015, giving the go-ahead for 48 houses to go on site during 2016. Detailed planning applications for the remainder of the proposed mixed use development will


Trump International Golf Course


be submitted in February 2016. The development will transform the site into a high quality lifestyle, leisure and ultimately global business location. Other parks within the corridor include:


D2, ABZ, Aberdeen International Business Park, Enerfield, Balmacassie Commercial Park and Energetica Commercial Park, offering a wide and varied range of options for businesses of all sizes. These are just a taste of the exciting


developments coming forward within Energetica. To find out more: Web: energetica.uk.com Twitter: @energetica_uk Linkedin: Energetica – Scotland’s Energy Corridor


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