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PL


Rem ‘F


Li


PLCS


SUPPLEMEN


SUPPLEMENT FEAT RE FEA ATURE


Remembering the ‘Father of the PLC’ Derek Lan


ering the r o th


Limited and deputy chairman of PROFIBUS and PROFINET International UK (PI UK), shares some of the insights gathered ughout his career


rek Lane,, autom tion ted and deput IN


Richard ‘‘Dick’


automationmanager at WA chairman of PROFI US l U (PI U ),


Intern io


shares som of the i sights gathered throughout his career from PLC inventor Richard


k’ Morley ( 932-201 duce downti still th ey (1932-2017)


reduce downtime. The PLC now is still the brain of a plant, but devicesce can constantly provide more fe


The PLC now i t, b t d


processes than ever before. Right now it’s an incredibly exciting time to be in industrial automation, as we’re right in the ddle of a huge step change i stry 4


it’s a exciting tim to the formof In


incre ibly in in


stria


Derek Lane is the deputrDe ek Lane is the deputy chairman of P and automation manager at WAGO


and automation manager at W I


read w th sadness of the recent passing of D ck M rley, the


the first PLC back in 1968. Richard was a big iwas a big influence on me and my career as an electrical engineer, hard to understate hi dustr


founder of Modicon, whi h created the first PLC, back in 19


read with sadness of the recent passing of Dick Morley, the under of


uence on m and m


He was a briilliant guy and a dynamic character with lots of energy. He l ed and breathed autom tion and w s al eas,


pact on our s a


had the pleasur of eeti g hi


career as an electri al engineer, and iand it’s hard to understate his impact on our industry. llia


dynamc character w th lots of energy. He lived and breathed automation and was always full of ideas, with plenty of insights to share about the state of the dustr


ys ful of th plenty of i sights to


share about the state of the industry. I had the pleasure of meeting him at a Drives & Controls show in 1993, where we discussed how far control systems had com and h


at a Dri es & Control


show in 1993, w ere w discussed how far control systems had come, and how the future was looking. At that point in time the internet it w s in its infa lik ly th


the future w s looking.


that point in tim the internet as we know it was in its infancy. But it still seemed likely that theth next great leap forward in autom tion w uld entail all


t it still se


next great l ap forward i automation would entail all


devices in the supply chain being mmu cate w th one


anoth r. A con roller w be abl


to al cate appropriate


devices in the supply chain being able to communicate with one another. A controller would thenthen be able to allocate appropriate resources wherever and whenever they are needed on the producti line. Wth the Internet of T ings, and the l test I oT-ready PLCs, now have the tools to achieve thi at hasn’ changed over the


years is the constant need to increase factory production andincrease factory production and


dicon, which created . R chard


y chairman of PI UK,


autom tion, as w ’re right in th middle of a huge step change in the form of Industry 4.0. Normally such paradigm shifts are defined after the fact, and this w


rmally


such paradigmshifts are defined after the fact, and this was


autom tion processes, this in turn reduced factory downtime for the customer. I should also note that he never consi ered theM dicon co


for the rolle to solely s in o s a teameffort fromthe


certainly the case w thM rley. As far as he was concerned, the PLC was simply a w y of making his job easier. And by reducing the time it took to program or reprogram automation processes, this in turn duced f ctory downti


certainly the case with Morley. As far as he was concerned, the PLC s sim ly a way ofm king his job easier. And by reducing the ti took to


ramor rep ram


customer. I should also note that he never considered the Modicon controller to be solely his inventiion; it was a team effort from the engineers at Bedford Associates. It w s only in retrospect that th world came to def ne hi


engineers at Bedford Associates. It was only in retrospect that the wor d cam to define his


innovation as the birth of Industry e’re in Industry


innovation as the birth of Industry 3.0. Right now


3.0. Right now w e i dustry


4.0 rather than l oki g back at i on the cusp of a new era of productivity. Whilst technical capabilities such as memory and processing power have improved, modern PLCs still share manyma similar features to the oriiginal designs. The need for robust, chani al


memo


processing pow r have i mo


similar fe to th devices that w thstand th still solvin th sa proved, gin


designs. The need for robust, mechanically well engineered devices that withstand the


engineered


demands of a busy factory hasn’t changed. At


GO our PLCs ar e


lin in 19 vile


tor to


resources w erever and w enever they are needed on the production line. With the Internet of Things, and the latest IIoT-ready PLCs, we now have the tools to achieve this. What hasn’t changed over the years is the constant need to


dow tim and lost productivity that Morley’s Mo icon controller first did on that General Motors line in 1968. It’s a priivilege to be carrying on his legacy.


Mod


t did on that Gener . It’s a


carrying on his legacy. Wago http://glo ttp://global.w l.wago.co /AUTOMAT .com/u /AUTOMA ION ATION /uk PLCS PLCS, INDUSTRIAL PCS RIAL PCS & HMISIS | NOVE OVEMBER 201 2017 S9 S9


dem nds of a busy factory hasn’ changed. At WAGO our PLCs are still solving the same probllems of downtime and lost productivity Mo


4.0 rather than looking back at it, on the cusp of a new era of productivity. W ilst technical capabilities such


intelligent feedback to enable more complex, and more responsive processes than ever before. t n


can constantl provi em intellig mp


ck to mo le re omPLC i ventor ger at WAGO


SMALLER JUST GOT STRONGER


PFC100 Controller: High performance packed into a smaller footprint


• Extremely compact and maintenance-free design saves control panel space


• 600 MHz processing power allows seamless automation of complex industrial systems


 via e!COCKPIT engineering software


• Scalable modular system ready for future challenges


• Comprehensive on-board data security packages


• Two ETHERNET interfaces for extensive compatibility


• Linux® operating system • CODESYS 3 runtime system


Telephone 01788 568 008 E-Mail ukmarketing@wago.com Internet www.wago.com Search for “WAGO PFC100”


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