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INDUSTRY FOCUS RENEWABLE ENERGY Change your approach to renewable energy


Power quality specialist, REO UK is urging businesses to reconsider their relationship with renewable energy. The company has released a whitepaper exploring the state of the renewable energy sector and argues that the time is ripe for organisations to think about how they can overcome problems such as the changes to feed-in tariffs, power quality problems, planning permission and the threat from cheap imports


he paper looks at the growth of the renewable sector, including recent figures that show that 2016 was a record year for the installation of renewable power, with 161GW added to the world’s capacity, with solar power leading the way. While the response from businesses has been positive, many have already committed to sourcing 100 per cent of their energy from renewable sources by 2020, Government incentives, such as the feed-in tariff scheme, have repeatedly come under fire. The feed-in tariff scheme alone has been widely criticised since its introduction in 2010. The paper looks at some of the alternative schemes and models of


T


renewable energy sourcing available to businesses. It also explores the ongoing challenge of planning permission, power quality and the threat of cheap imports of heavily subsidised renewable solar panels from China. “Along with a change of approach to renewable energy models, business leaders must also consider the quality of the renewable equipment they buy,” explains Steve Hughes, managing director of REO UK. “Now that renewable technologies are becoming a reality for many businesses, it's important to understand issues such as electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility.


REO manufactures resistive and inductive wound components for use with static frequency converter drives in lift and HVAC applications


“We’ve written this whitepaper to


inform business leaders thinking about adopting renewable technologies as part of the wider initiative to go green. Although larger businesses have had the resources to try their hand at renewable technologies for many years now, renewables have only recently offered a financially viable and strategically sustainable alternative to fossil fuels.” The whitepaper can be downloaded from REO UK’s website at www.reo.co.uk/files/white_paper_- _the_changing_approach_to_renewable _energy.pdf and anyone interested in power quality components for renewable applications should call 01588 673411.


GOVERNMENT COMMITS TO COST-EFFECTIVE CLEAN GROWTH A


n ambitious strategy setting out how the UK is leading the world in cutting carbon emissions to combat climate change while driving


economic growth, has been published by Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark. ‘The Clean Growth Strategy: Leading the way to a low carbon future’ builds on the UK’s strong progress to date. Carbon emissions in the UK have fallen and national income risen faster and further than any other nation in the G7 – since 1990, emissions are down by 42 per cent while the economy has grown by 67 per cent. The Government’s strategy sets out how the whole country can


benefit from low carbon economic opportunities through the creation of new technologies and new businesses, which create jobs and prosperity across the UK, while meeting ambitious national targets to tackle climate change. For the first time the Government is setting out in the Strategy how over


£2.5 billion will be invested to support low carbon innovation from 2015 to 2021, as part of the largest increase in public spending on science, research and innovation in over three decades. This funding covers programmes delivering low carbon energy, transport, agriculture and waste. The £2.5 billion of existing Government spending includes up to £505


million from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s Energy Innovation Programme, which aims to accelerate the commercialisation of innovative clean energy technologies and processes. There are already more than 430,000 jobs in low carbon businesses and their supply chains. Today’s policies will provide further opportunities


16 NOVEMBER 2017 | AUTOMATION


right across the country for more jobs, higher earning power and increased productivity. The low carbon economy could grow 11 per cent per year between 2015 and 2030 – faster than the rest of the economy. The Government recently announced the establishment of a taskforce of


senior financial experts to accelerate growth of green finance in the UK’s low carbon economy. It has been given six months to deliver ambitious proposals to accelerate investment in the transition to a low carbon economy, creating high-value jobs and opportunities for UK businesses. It will examine a range of interventions, from making infrastructure investment more sustainable, to scaling-up green mortgages. The Strategy fulfils the Government’s ongoing commitment to


demonstrate how it will continue to deliver carbon reductions. The UK was the first country in the world to introduce a Climate Change Act that sets a legally binding long-term target and a series of five-year caps on greenhouse gas emissions up to 2050. Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said: “This Government has put clean growth at the heart of its Industrial Strategy to increase productivity, boost people’s earning power and ensure Britain continues to lead the world in efforts to tackle climate change. “For the first time in a generation, the British government is leading the way on taking decisions on new nuclear, rolling out smart meters and investing in low carbon innovation.”


www.gov.uk/government/publications/clean-growth-strategy /AUTOMATION


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