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BSEE-AUG21-P38 Installation News_Layout 1 22/07/2021 15:41 Page 38


BSEE Advertorial


The sharks, seals, penguins and other creatures at SEA LIFE Weymouth are benefitting from a more sustainable environment following the installation of an ABB variable speed drive.


Installing a variable speed drive (VSD) to the creature habitats’ water aeration system at SEA LIFE Weymouth has allowed the resident sea animals to enjoy a quieter, cleaner and greener environment. The centre will also benefit from lower operating costs and a reduction in energy usage.


The ABB drive was one of two previously deployed on a sea pump application. It was subsequently determined that only one drive was needed, freeing up the second to be used elsewhere. With the help of ABB Value Provider, IDS, the park identified an aeration system's blower used to oxygenate water within the habitats housing the attraction's thousands of aquatic residents, as a candidate for repurposing the VSD.


SPONSORS INSTALLATION NEWS ABB drive helps to make life under the sea a better place to be


Following the retrofit, the VSD enabled a 10 percent reduction of the blower's motor speed, resulting in an energy saving of £839 per year. By finely controlling the valves on the air lines running to each tank, the park's staff can adjust the pressure depending on a display’s occupants. The blower now runs quieter than before, helping to create a more pleasant environment for guests viewing the animals.


A rapid installation and commissioning lasting approximately one hour ensured no disruption of the air supply, assuring the safety of the animals. Blaise Ford, Managing Director, IDS, says: “This was an enjoyable project to work on as it’s not every day that we get to work with seals, stingrays and penguins. However, at the same time the pressure was on to get the job done quickly to ensure an


uninterrupted supply of air for the habitats. The installation went swimmingly!”


www.abb.com University of Birmingham School of Engineering


Engineering innovators of the future will be studying in comfort and style at the University of Birmingham’s brand new £46.5m School of Engineering building, thanks to Waterloo’s innovative air distribution products.


Waterloo’s Thermally Actuated and Fixed Blade Swirl Diffusers, Louvre Faced Diffusers and Airline and Eggcrate Grilles were used extensively throughout the building.


Working with mechanical engineering contractor NG Bailey, Waterloo was asked to propose a package of high-quality air distribution products for use throughout the building. The system had already been designed to Stage 4 by ARUP and then finalised and adopted by NG Bailey, with the final aesthetics approved by Associated Architects. One of the main challenges of this project was the aesthetics. Waterloo was able to match a wide range of RAL paint finishes to ensure that the right product could be used without compromising on appearance.


Waterloo answered the challenge of heating and cooling the impressive double-height atrium by


installing Thermally Actuated Swirl Diffusers (SDACH) at high level (up to 20m). These variable swirl diffusers automatically sense the temperature of the air supply and adjust the blade angle accordingly without the need for a power supply. This constant adjustment works for both vertical and horizontal throw and ensures excellent induction and best comfort in the occupied zone.


Optimum comfort conditions were achieved for all the office, study and workshop areas by using Fixed Blade Swirl Diffusers (SDFC). Used throughout the project in both ceiling and sidewall applications were Louvre Faced Diffusers (DF41), Eggcrate Grilles (GC5) and Airline Linear Grilles (ALG) which are available in the wide range of special options and finishes that made them so well-suited to this project.


www.waterloo.co.uk Veolia optimise lighting for one of the biggest acute hospital Trusts


As part of the £4 million energy performance contract with United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT), Veolia has now upgraded lighting at Lincoln County Hospital, Pilgrim Hospital in Boston, and Grantham and District Hospital.


The upgrade has covered the installation of 10,106 LED light fittings, including standard and emergency luminaires across the main hospital sites.


The new systems are linked to smart controls and sensors that monitor ambient light and presence, control output to the correct level, dim and switch when there is sufficient daylight and illuminate only when the area is occupied. These combine an improved quality of lighting throughout each building with annual energy savings of 4,522,344kWh per year, and CO2 savings of over 2,400 tonnes.


Backing the lighting upgrades are a range of carbon reducing measures including a new combined heat and power plant, boiler enhancements, conversion of the steam system to a low temperature hot water


network, new electrical infrastructure upgrades and control systems for the facilities that cover 74,174m2. The new plant will be operated and maintained by Veolia's engineering teams for 15 years, with investment payback achieved in just over three years.


The new contract will build on the reductions achieved by Veolia at Lincoln Hospital where around 64,000 tonnes of CO2 has been saved since 2004, and included the successful ‘90k in 90 days’ initiative, a three-month challenge to engage staff to make regular, small, money- saving changes. This resulted in the Trust cutting its overall carbon footprint by 13 per cent between 2009 and 2015 against a national average of 10 per cent.


www.veolia.co.uk Viega launches new compact press tool with app integration


Part of the latest generation of Viega press tools, the compact, ergonomic and versatile Pressgun Picco 6 Plus makes press connection installation simple, even in the most confined or awkward spaces. It also features Bluetooth connectivity and app integration for improved safety, security and streamlined tool management.


38 BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER AUGUST 2021


The Viega Pressgun Picco 6 Plus has a new inline configuration and has been designed to operate as a natural extension of the arm. At just 1.6kg, it is 700g lighter than the previous generation Pressgun Picco and allows comfortable one-handed operation. The Pressgun Picco 6 Plus delivers a 24kN pressing force and is compatible with metallic Viega press connectors in dimensions from 12 to 35 mm, Megapress thick-walled steel tube connectors from 3/8 to 3/4 inch and plastic and multilayer composite pipe systems from 12 to 40 mm. Among the key innovations included in the latest generation of Viega press tools is the smart connectivity. Pressgun Picco 6 Plus connects to a smartphone or other connected device via Bluetooth and allows additional functionality through the


Viega Tool Services app. Customers can view full tool information and the current status at any time, including battery level and the total number of pressings since the last service.


Due to refinements in the design, the Pressgun Picco 6 Plus has longer service intervals than previous models at 40,000 pressings or 4 years, whichever occurs first, and features an automatic safety shutdown after 42,000 pressings. The new increased capacity 12 V batteries are available in 3.0 and 6.0 Ah versions and are protected within the casing of the press tool. For even greater flexibility, it is also compatible with other commercially available batteries.


www.viega.co.uk Read the latest at: www.bsee.co.uk


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