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BUSINESS NEWS BREXIT


Dan Micklethwaite, Department for Transport


‘Recession bigger threat to airlines than Brexit’


Experts predict global economy to hit airlines more than Brexit. Ian Taylor reports Micklethwaite was speaking in


UK aviation is in “a good place” on Brexit regardless of what happens in the coming days, senior industry figures believe. However, there are concerns


about what comes aſter with airline association Iata warning of “a serious risk” of recession. An end to the uncertainty on


Brexit appeared finally in sight this week despite the fresh blow to the government on Saturday when MPs forced the prime minister to write to


80 24 OCTOBER 2019


the EU seeking a delay. Te government was poised to try


to win a fresh vote on its Brexit deal as Travel Weekly went to press, but with the EU likely to grant an extension if needed to avoid a no-deal exit. Yet Department for Transport


(DfT) aviation director Dan Micklethwaite assured an Airlines 2050 conference in London late last week: “Flights will continue even in a no-deal Brexit. Tere is a contingency plan in place in the event of no deal.”


place of transport secretary Grant Shapps who pulled out of the conference on October 17 because of the uncertainty around Brexit. He insisted the EU and DfT would “make sure flights continue whatever happens” and said: “Overall, the sector is flourishing.” However, Micklethwaite also


Continued on page 78 travelweekly.co.uk


BUSINESS NEWS


PICTURES: Billypix


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