search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
See Portugal


A growing network of paths makes cycling a fun and healthy way to explore central and northern Portugal


At one time there were so many bicycles in Portugal that they were legally required to carry registration plates. Today, thanks to an ever- expanding network of cycle paths and purpose-built boardwalks along the mid-section of the Atlantic coast, more locals and visitors are once again getting in the saddle to enjoy the many delights that this beautiful region of Portugal has to offer.


Firmly and unashamedly on an


e-bike (a standard cycle fitted with an electric power pack), Travel Weekly joined a trade fam trip to sample highlights of the route. The trip was organised by the Centre of Portugal Tourism Association, and co-hosted by the Portuguese Tourist Board, with flights from TAP Air Portugal.


1. AFURADA – ESPINHO


Porto and the North 16km/1 hour 20 minutes


We touched down in Porto and began our cycling tour in nearby Afurada. We set off southwards, pedalling


2. VARELA – SALREU


Centre of Portugal 30km/3 hours


This route took us past the Ria de Aveiro lagoon, offering an enchanting window on the wildlife species which call the Centre of Portugal home. Flamingos revealed their striking pink and black markings on the underside of their wings as they appeared to almost run across the surface of the water for take-off. We also stopped at Aveiro – often likened to Venice because of its canals – and jumped on board a traditional moliceiro boat.


past stretches of beaches which line nearly 1,000km of the country’s coastline. Most of this route was on well-maintained boardwalks. Waves, known here as ‘Atlantic rollers’, crashed below us in the early October sunshine. When the route took a detour through sleepy villages, Pedro Pedrosa, co- founder of A2Z, led the way, although there is an app available for those who are happy to navigate themselves.


Once used to dredge seaweed, the colourful wooden vessels are largely used today as a tourist attraction.


3. SÃO PEDRO DE MOEL – NAZARÉ


Centre of Portugal 21km/2 hours


We were told to prepare for a serious ‘wow’ moment when we arrived in the town of Nazaré. The beaches and waves here attract an international surfing crowd and the dramatic coastline rivals California’s renowned Big Sur. It’s truly epic, and watching the surfers riding the huge rollers was mesmerising. At the little market in the town square, we saw stallholders dressed in the traditional clothes of fishermen’s wives, including seven skirts all worn together. We also visited the nearby Unesco World Heritage Site of the Monastery of Alcobaça. Built around 900 years ago, the magnificent Gothic-style church was constructed to impress the Pope – and it succeeded, eventually laying the foundation for Portugal as a nation.


VISITPORTUGAL.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92