search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DESTINATIONS AUSTRASIA | ADEIDE TO PERTH


CAMPERVAN DOS AND DONT’S


AUSSIE


DO choose the right van for you. They vary in size


enormously – a basic two-berth camper may be a bit tight and lacking in facilities, but a six-berth behemoth might be a nightmare to park and very fuel-intensive.


DON’T go 4x4 unless you need to. Most sights of interest


in Australia are reached via sealed roads, or dirt tracks that a conventional 2WD camper van can handle just fine.


DO book in advance during peak season. In December,


January and February, most rental vans are booked out.


DON’T drive at night. Kangaroos get active from dusk


onwards, and have very little road sense. You really don’t want to hit one.


DO book longer trips. The longer you book the van for,


the cheaper the per-day price will be. Some companies impose two-week minimums.


DON’T forget to check what’s covered, including things like


whether it has cooking facilities and internal showers. You should also check things such as kitchen equipment (usually included) and bedding (usually not, for hygiene reasons).


these sea lions for decades. They’re inquisitive creatures, like puppies at times,


and are just as fascinated by the humans who’ve dropped into the water as we are with them. They flit around playfully, and sometimes stare straight at your snorkel mask.


THE HIGH ROAD This alone would be worth doing the drive, but perhaps the biggest surprise of the whole road trip is that this great moment isn’t followed by intense boredom. It’s not long after Baird Bay that the phone signal dies and the wheatbelt turns to unremitting scrub, where small hardy bushes are the only things that can survive in the parched landscape. The Eyre Highway ploughs through it, interspersed largely by roadhouses. These roadhouses – fuelling stops and beds for the night – all have their own story to them, and these are collated together as part of the world’s longest golf course. The Nullarbor Links is an ingenious project, spreading


18 holes across 850 miles between Ceduna and Kalgoorlie. The fairways may not be the most lush you’ll ever see, but the history of how each hole came into being, told on signposts at each tee, are fascinating


66 24 OCTOBER 2019


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Swimming with sea lions, Baird Bay; Seven Hill Cellars,


Clare Valley; whale-watching; old Nullarbor Roadhouse PICTURES: South Australian Tourism Commission/ John Montesi/Peter Eve/Michael Waterhouse; Tourism Australia/ Adam Bruzzone/Greg Snell


33Sea lions are like puppies at times. They flit around playfully, and sometimes stare straight at your snorkel mask


insights into outback life. They’ll have you saluting petrol tanker drivers who’ve ploughed the Nullarbor for decades or telling the tale of a German settler who abandoned a whaling ship then set up a farm in the middle of nowhere.


ICONS OF INDUSTRY At some of the stops, there’s something meatier to delve into. In Eucla, the first stop over the West Australian border, there are the ruins of an old telegraph station among the sand dunes. This was the main base for the telegraph line that ran across the country, and signs tell of the arduous efforts that went into constructing and maintaining it. Then further along at Balladonia, a little museum tells the tale of the Skylab space station, which crashed to


travelweekly.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92