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Durban legend


The city is the springboard to a bigger and better South African experience, writes Jo Cooke


DESTINATIONS DURBAN | AFRICA


s travelweekly.co.uk


outh Africa’s third-largest city is stepping out of the shadow of her two big sisters, Cape Town and Jo’burg. That pair have long had direct services from the UK,


and carved out their tourism niches, but now Durban is getting in on the act with British Airways’ launch of the only non-stop link with Europe last October. The new route makes it even easier to access Durban’s mix of sand and sea, plus adrenaline-pumping activity and fascinating history, with wildlife, mountains and more in easy reach. Here are a few of the highlights you could sell to clients looking for a different side of South Africa.


URBAN DURBAN Moses Mabhida Stadium: Built for the 2010 World Cup, the stadium, with its signature ‘arch of triumph’ rooftop, is now the stage for a multitude of sporting and cultural events, plus the Big Rush (bigrush.co.za). This attraction, both a rope swing and a bungee jump, involves climbing 352 stairs to the rafters, descending a ladder, then crab-walking onto the launch platform, before simply putting one foot in front of the other to step off into thin air. It’s a four-second freefall before the


 6 JUNE 2019 61


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