search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
The Interview


Tony Andrews, Cruise.co.uk


Cruise.co.uk's newly appointed deputy managing


director talks to Harry Kemble about working his way up after starting his career at the OTA as a temp


B


y his own admission, Tony Andrews’ cruise-selling career began


“purely by accident”. Back in 2000, while picking up his


then-girlfriend at the recruitment agency she worked at, he was offered a week’s temp work at Cruise Collection, part of Victoria Travel – the former name of Cruise.co.uk. On his first day at the agency in


Birmingham, he was initially turned away and told another temp had been booked. Unable to get home, Andrews was invited to stay and make coffees for the day.


First break Andrews, though, was “desperate to sell cruise”. Cruise Collection was then UK general sales agent for now- defunct Renaissance Cruises. Soon, Andrews impressed two members of the Renaissance on-the-road sales team with his enthusiasm. “I told them how desperate I was and how good I thought I could be,” he recalls. He has never looked back. Te Renaissance team told Andrew


10 6 JUNE 2019


Gardner, the owner of Victoria Travel, that Andrews should be put on the phones immediately. “My first booking was a £25,000 cruise around South America,” he says. “Te other sales consultants couldn’t believe it and had to help me through the sale as it happened so quickly.” Andrews went on to work across


most departments. In 2003, when the first Cruise.co.uk website launched, Andrews was in the corner of the office uploading the deals and fielding the calls. It is fair to say Andrews was a natural salesman. For five consecutive years, he was Cruise.co.uk’s top-selling consultant before moving to the product and marketing team and launching the tailor-made tour operating side of the business in 2013. Collectively,


tailor-made and Cruise.co.uk’s Bucket List Collection now generate bookings worth more than £50 million. Andrews said a key mentor


was Seamus Conlon. Te agency’s former chief executive stepped down last month to pursue other interests, which paved the way for Andrews to move up to the deputy managing director role. Chris Gardner replaced Conlon as chief executive.


Forward-thinking “I have always tried to learn from the people running this business,” Andrews says. “Tis is a smart, forward-thinking business and we aim to carry that on.” Conlon oversaw the


acquisition of German cruise


OTA Kreuzfahrtberater.de, in a deal worth €25 million, in 2017. “It is well known that the


company wants to build on its leading position in the market and be the number-one cruise agency in Europe – especially aſter the investment in KFB,” Andrews says, adding that Cruise.co.uk is “perfectly placed” to achieve that with its deals, consultants and online cruise community. “It is the place consumers research


their cruise and can speak to an expert immediately,” he says. “Cruise is a considered purchase – people want advice from real cruise people. We have that with our consultants, who all love cruise, as well as thousands of real cruise reviews and a forum full of cruise fanatics. “A cruise purchase can be quite


My first booking was a £25,000 cruise around South America. The other sales


consultants couldn't believe it and had to help me through the sale as it happened so quickly


complex. I don’t think [selling] cruise will change over the next five years. Cruise ships, and their cabins, will be different, but people still need to understand their purchase.” It is that atention to detail that


has helped him secure the position of deputy managing director – 19 years on from making coffee as a temp.


travelweekly.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80