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DOMOTEX INTERVIEW 62


He spent his youth in the Tehran bazaar and briefly


worked for Germany’s second largest bank. These days he is known for creating timeless classics


Photography | Domotex, various Words | Richard Burton


There’s little that represents Iranian culture better than a Persian hand made carpet. And there are few better contemporary exponents of this classic art than Hossein Rezvani. Hamburg-born and part of a family who have been producing and distributing such masterpieces from their home country for generations, he now heads an eponymous empire which is known all over the world. But, despite all that modern technology has to off er, his dedication and passion for the industry means he still relies on the most traditional methods, designing each new rug himself and insisting on adding a trademark contemporary twist to everything he produces. Avoiding mass production in preference to creating unique pieces that


families will hand down through generations, his designs have become a way of telling the history and culture of his country, weaved in with


a way of expressing all his personal aesthetics. They are, as many of his customers, not to mention admirers, would agree, modern classics.


QUO TE


BACK TO CONTENTS DOMOTEX PREVIEW 2020


The grandson of a carpet trader in the Tehran bazaar, he was born and raised in Hamburg. His father had come to Germany in the 1960s as an economist but still traded in rugs which meant that, throughout the 1970s and 1980s, a young Hossein would accompany him on many of his return visits to Iran.


It’s interesting to note at this stage that carpets were not his original career move. He initially followed in his father’s footsteps by working for Commerzbank, Germany’s second biggest fi nancial institution.


But it wasn’t long before he realised that was not where his interests lay; his years in those bazzars having


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