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DOMOTEX ENJOY HANNOVER 34


Park. It’s one of the largest connected city forests in Europe, blessed with acres of oak and beech woodland interspersed with lawns, water features and playgrounds. The park was a managed forest, producing timber for 600 years before it opened to the public in the 19th century. For any fi rst-time visitor wanting a comprehensive view, their itinerary


would, ideally, include Kröpcke, a large pedestrian area where all the serious shopping is done, and home to the Opera house. It’s also awash with places to eat and where you’ll fi nd main station in the Hannover Stadtbahn network. All Stadtbahn lines except the 10 and 17, call at the station which is also the main interchange point for the network. Famously, there is even a big green clock – known as the KröpckeUhr - which has traditionally served as an ideal meeting point for tourists, along with the statue of Ernst-August. The clock sits in the middle of an eponymous pedestrian zone situated at the intersection of the Georgstraße and Bahnhofstraße. It’s not just a landmark; but more a rare piece of Classical design in a modern part of the city, which dates back to 1885 and named after the Café Kröpcke, which sits behind it.


TALES OF MUNCHHAUSEN On a wider level, Castle Marienburg 20km to the south is considered one of the most important neo-Gothic historical buildings in Germany, taking visitors back to the days of a typical Hannoverian court; its turrets dominating the rolling hills of the Leine valley. Its modern zoo has a reputation as one of the best within Europe,


comprehensively dividing some 2,000 animals from all over the world live into six special areas. Its Sea Life centre even boasts its own rainforest. Among the most famous tourist spots are the baroque gardens of Herrenhausen, created in the 17th century to mirror the Versailles Garden in France, a visitor staple in the summer but its beauty is still evident in the winter. It’s notable for another French connection:


a glimmering cave decorated by Niki de Saint Phalle whose work is very evident in several places, including the Sprengel Museum. In celebration of her contribution, she was later granted an honorary citizenship and, on its renovation, the underground shopping passage from the central station to Kröpcke was named “The Niki de Saint-Phalle Promenade”. Elsewhere, the Lower


Saxony State Museum comprises of four diff erent departments which exhibit an impressive array of fi ne arts, archaeology, natural history and also ethnology; its Renaissance and Baroque galleries are bolstered by great artists such as Rembrandt, Rubens and Dürer.


In the other departments, Bronze


Age jewellery and the mummifi ed human remains from the moorlands of Lower Saxony have pride of place along with models of dinosaurs and an aquarium in the natural history department, as well as some 20,000 pieces of traditional art collected from Oceania, Africa, America and Asia in the ethnology section. The nearby village of Bodenwerder


plays host to the home of Baron Munchhausen, who is best known for the extraordinary and often far- fetched tales surrounding his life


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DOMOTEX PREVIEW 2020


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