search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
68 Companies will exhibit at the Small Publishers’ Fair


Shin, and this has raised ques- tions around power, justice and solidarit. The festival intends to reignite a long-standing line of feminist enquiry through discussions about feminist myth-making. “It felt urgent to me to highlight the feminist work in the realm of mythology in this current moment, when reactionary and fascistic forces are instrumentalising their power to stoke misogynistic and reactionary sentiments,” says Shin. “And the mythos [signifying a tale, or a set of beliefs or assumptions] that continues to dominate the world around us remains overwhelmingly patriarchal. We saw its power in the [Supreme Court nominee] Bret Kavanaugh [sexual harassment] case, which rested on the legal codification of misogynistic myths. I place New Suns within a lineage of feminist speculative thinking that asks: ‘What new stories and counter- narratives can be invented to build our feminist futures?’” Featuring speakers including Sophie Mackintosh, Preti Taneja and Pat Cadigan, the festival will discuss topics such as the worlds of Ursula K Le Guin, power and disobedient women, and sex workers’ rights. Also, in the spirit of the 1980s International Feminist Book Fairs, more than 30 publishers—including Penguin Random House, Hachete, Fitzcarraldo Editions, Verso and Serpent’s Tail—will host stalls and book signings in free-to-access spaces at the Barbican.


The title “New Suns” is inspired by African-American science fiction author Octavia Butler’s epigraph to her final, unfinished novel: “There is nothing new under the sun, but there are new suns.” Taking place on Saturday 3rd November, the festival is part of the Barbican’s Art of Change season, which explores how the arts respond to, reflect and poten- tially affect change in the social and political landscape. Tickets to the festival are available from the Barbican’s website.


TheBookseller.com


Top Five Indie Bookshops


AGAIN HOST THE SMALL PUBLISHERS’ FAIR


LONDON’S CONWAY HALL WILL ONCE


MAN BOOKER WINNER ANNA BURNS WAS TOPS FOR INDIE BOOKSELLERS


1


Milkman Anna Burns Faber


2


Tombland C J Sansom Mantle


3


The Tattooist of Auschwitz Heather Morris Zaffre


4


Churchill: Walking with Destiny Andrew Roberts Allen Lane


5


Always Look on the Bright Side of Life Eric Idle W&N


Week ending 20th October 2018 Data source Nielsen BookScan


Regional and overseas lists a focus as record numbers exhibit at indie presses fair


S


ixty-eight small presses will be descending on Central London’s Conway


Hall in the second week of November, for the 17th edition of the Small Publishers’ Fair. With the largest number of


exhibitors in the event’s history, the fair will showcase books by artists, poets, writers, book designers and their publishers. Two-thirds of the exhibiting publishers will be travelling to London from bases as far flung as Amsterdam (Boekie Woekie), Berlin (Red Sphinx), Tokyo (Yasushi Cho / Laughter) and Venice (Damocle Edizioni). Participating UK publishers include Hoxton Mini Press, ottoGraphic, Test Centre, Shearsman Books and CB Editions. Participation is by invitation,


and programming is a “careful balancing act” in terms of geography, types of press, and blending new faces and previous participants, says organiser Helen Mitchell. “It is important that the


Small Publishers’ Fair has many publishers from outside London”, she added. “Te fair has always been about bringing great small publishers to London from across the UK and further afield.“ She added: “In the years since


the first fair in 2002, many similar events have come on the scene—a good few are in London, meaning that London publishers have a


good range of options for getting their work out there. Te Small Publishers’ Fair’s focus on two-thirds of exhibitors coming from beyond London brings new faces for the city’s audiences to discover and draws visitors to the capital for the fair to see this showcase of some of the best of this thriving sector.” Te fair is distinctive for the


quality and range of work on show, which includes artists’ books, fine press editions, zines, poetry pamphlets and postcards. Many of these works are usually only available to purchase online. Te fair is also an important


meeting ground for the publishers themselves, many of which often attend the fair even if they are not exhibiting. “Many new projects have their beginnings from conversations held at the fair,” said Mitchell. Te first fair, in 2002, took


place at the Southbank’s Royal Festival Hall. Te following year, it moved to Conway Hall in Red Lion Square, which is described as a “landmark of London’s independent intellectual, political and cultural life”. Mitchell says “it’s a natural home for the Small Publishers’ Fair”.





The 2018 Small Publishers’ Fair takes place at Conway Hall in Red Lion Square, central London on Friday 9th and Saturday 10th November, running from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on both days.


13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36