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YOUR COMMENTS


FINDING A BALANCE Thanks for a thought-provoking read, Amon (According to Amon: Mind the platform, Buying Business Travel, May/June 2019); you make several good points here. I agree with your prediction that TMCs will need to adjust their positioning/articulation of their value proposition as new players enter the market and new travel managers (who are increasingly coming from a non-TMC/ agency background) step into that role. In response to your question I would,


however, modify it slightly to say, “the absolute number one priority of travel management has become managing technology to help travellers and support the managed programme”. No matter how strong the economy or


competitive the job market, managing travel must always take into consideration the overall value proposition for the company, or what’s the point? There has to be a benefit to the organisation or why manage travel at all? Fortunately, technology is helping to


bridge the balance of the two priorities (traveller satisfaction and programme management) in a more conducive way. Overall, it’s an exciting time to be a part of


this industry – one that I believe will usher in a new era full of improvements for both traveller and travel manager, but as with all


TALK BACK


HAVE YOUR SAY AND SHARE YOUR VIEWS AT


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


progress there may be some bumps on the road. Or, put another way, I


think there are opportunities for those who have enough foresight to take advantage of the changing landscape! Jo Lloyd


(via BBT website)


ON THE RIGHT TRACK Commuting during 2018 was painful, but since the start of this year, Southern


has provided an excellent service (Southern ‘least trusted’ rail company, buyingbusinesstravel.com). Credit where it is due, commuting is no longer a hardship. I hope they keep up the good service. “Mart”


(via BBT website)


‘Booziness travel’ and how to create readable hashtags


BBTWEETS


@OLIWALKERJONES Another cancelled flight tonight. Germany will have to wait! Takes my tally for the year to 17% of all my flights cancelled. Did I do something to anger the flying gods!?


@GMCKENZIESMITH On an @LNER train and the conductor just made an announcement to ask if anyone has a corkscrew to open a lady’s bottle of wine. Above and beyond.


@A_J_BURGESS Good to see the UK leading the way on the most important topic in the world: “Climate change: UK government to commit to 2050 target”.


92 JULY/AUGUST 2019


Follow us on Twitter: @BBT_online, @matt_parsons & @mbdyson


Brian Negus, an ambassador for Vista – a charity providing support and services to people with sight loss – has highlighted how the business travel industry can make social media more accessible to sight-impaired users of screen readers. Negus recently commented on


one of our online news stories: “My screen reader said ‘booziness travel’ for your #businesstravel hashtag.” He says this happens because


@PAULTILSTONE Why should they have to? (“Travel managers don’t communicate about online booking tools”, buyingbusinesstravel.com). Why don’t OBTs just work really well and satisfy traveller needs? Not sure I get it. Booking.com, Amazon and Netflix have never had to “communicate” with me. #Crux


screen readers see the hashtags as one word unless each word in the hashtag has a capital letter, for example, #BusinessTravel. Negus has put up a YouTube


video that shows how to make hashtags accessible for users of screen readers. Find the video at the Brian Negus YouTube channel. We encourage our readers and


colleagues to use #BusinessTravel and #MakeHashtagsAccessible ■ Follow Brian on Twitter @BrianNegus


buyingbusinesstravel.com


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