search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
bed, or the business class flights, or the nice rental car, which got them the deal. Most of the time it was the personal aspect which got that deal over the line, which


is a combination of connecting with someone’s personality and understanding their culture.” TripLingo is another useful platform for business travellers. This app allows instant voice and image translation, features a database of phrases in the local language, etiquette and tipping information, and tools that save money on roaming costs and access critical safety information in case of an emergency. Travel and Transport Statesman worked with TripLingo for several years,


TripLingo app


MODEL BEHAVIOUR


DO YOU KNOW YOUR Trompenaars model from your Hofstede Cultural Dimensions? These models are commonly referred to when analysing the difference between cultures. Trompenaars’ model of cultural


Transport Inc, says TripLingo also takes duty-of-care to a whole new level. “Travellers don’t get excited by safety; it’s unlikely something will happen. But for a travel manager, when you have thousands of trips in a programme, it’s useful,” he notes. “There’s also a better


differences is a framework for cross-cultural communication applied to general business and management, and was developed by Fons Trompenaars and Charles Hampden-Turner. It highlights key comparisons to consider, such as achievement versus ascription, and universalism versus particularism. It was based on research from across 43 countries. www2.thtconsulting.com The Hofstede Cultural Dimensions theory


also looks at countries’ values across different factors, including individualism versus collectivism, and masculinity versus femininity. It was developed by Geert Hofstede and describes the effects of a society’s culture on the values of its members, and how these values relate to behaviour. hofstede-insights.com/country-comparison


SENDING SOMEONE IN GERMANY AN EMAIL ASKING THEM TO DO SOMETHING ON FRIDAY IS UNACCEPTABLE


before acquiring it recently. It featured in its own Dash platform, but now there are wider benefits and “tie-ins” for members in its global TMC network Radius Travel. TripLingo founder Jesse Maddox says: “TripLingo isn’t just language, it’s a Swiss army knife for challenges with international travel. There are two benefits: the safety side and the day-to-day practical side. I know a travel manager who was in France, and ended up in a hospital where no one spoke English. They communicated with doctors using TripLingo to let them know what had happened.” Michael Kubasik, executive vice-president and chief information officer at Travel and


buyingbusinesstravel.com


customer experience. Why? We listen to the customers, and there are a lot of travel managers. They’re asking for this type of delivery. It’s convenient.” For now, the exact benefits of adopting cultural intelligence in a travel programme may be hard to quantify. However, as Nina & Pinta’s Lloyd notes: “It’s not a specific science, but it gives you the best possible guide to where the potential is for you to come unstuck.”


In the current climate of Brexit and greater cultural sensitivities, anything to promote greater tolerance should be welcomed, and cultural IQ might just offer your business a passport to success.


Jo Lloyd of Nina & Pinta led a session on culture at the ITM Conference


2019 JULY/AUGUST 71


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100