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GROUND TRANSPORT


AT THE MOMENT, MOBILITY AS A SERVICE


IS VERY MUCH ABOUT SINGLE TRANSACTIONS


ON-DEMAND BOOKING PLATFORM


Booking platform Groundscope has formed a partnership with technology con- sultancy DataArt to create a new updated car booking app. The two companies worked together to


create the new iOS app for Apple mobile devices, which allows corporate clients to book services with transport providers around the globe. The new app gives users the ability to


arrange and manage journeys, as well as making all payments through a secured platform. DataArt is also working on an updated Android version of Groundscope’s app. John McCallion,


SUBSCRIPTION OR PAY AS YOU GO? One of the first questions sure to come up in any discus- sion about MaaS is how will organisations end up paying for these services? While there is clearly a long-term goal of offering a subscription-based service, many in the industry think that corporate clients will initially test the water by opting for “pay as you go” models. Sandra Witzel, head of marketing at MaaS technology


specialist Skedgo, says: “There is a movement behind the subscription model, favoured, for example, by Finnish MaaS app Whim. But, at the moment, MaaS is very much about single transactions, which is already an improve- ment if it can be done all within the same environment.” Witzel thinks that corporate clients will mostly want to set a budget for what their travellers can spend on ground transport when booking through a MaaS platform. “For business travel, we’re looking at what we call


corporate mobility or mobility budgets,” she explains. “Business travellers would be able to use their budget via a customised MaaS app. The companies can manage and analyse the budget behind the scenes and have the ability to incentivise certain travel behaviour, such as using public transport.” Witzel also points to some potential pitfalls of a sub- scription-based form of payment for ground transport services. “A subscription would require the traveller to have very consistent travel behaviour every month,” she says. “With video and music streaming, users can change their behaviour with little financial consequence as the monthly fees are comparatively low. A transport subscription is a lot higher and customers can potentially lose out if they don’t use their transport allowance fully for a few months in a row.”


76 JULY/AUGUST 2019


Groundscope’s chief ex- ecutive, told BBT: “What our clients have asked for is the same level of service that they receive on our pre-booked service but available on demand. “We have


listened to this and have invested in launching a new iOS and Android mobile app built by our technology partner DataArt and now provide an on-demand service in the 500 cities we operate in so that our customers can use us while on business within a city.” Anton Krasikov, account manager


at DataArt, added: “The challenge for DataArt was to create Groundscope’s iOS application and integrate it smoothly with the existing booking platform. The resulting solution offers users a modern look and feel combined with a high-quality service in line with leading-edge technology.”


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