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NEWS | Round-up


Our climate change champion, Richard Hagan, managing director of Crystal Doors, looks at how new energy labels will help consumers make choices that will benefi t the environment and their pockets


ECO LABELLING Get ahead with


A NEW energy labelling system will be rolled out for electrical appliances in the UK and EU this month. Energy labels encourage us to consider the true lifetime cost of a product rather than just the price. Get the cheapest, least effi cient model and you end up losing money in the long-term. The same goes for sustainable changes I’ve made at Crystal Doors. Our green investments cost more initially, but the electricity savings have boosted our bottom line.


A new era We’re entering an era of eco-design and green labelling. In addition to increased energy-effi ciency requirements, this year’s new rules oblige manufacturers to make electrical products last longer. Manufacturers must also provide spares to enable repairs for up to 10 years. The new regulations are a response to the ‘right to


repair’ movement that is spreading across Europe and North America. People are fed up of products that break down just after their warranty expires. We want quality goods that last. The old linear economy of ‘take, make, use, throw away’ is being replaced by a circular economy where extended life, repair, reuse and take- back are the norm.


In this new normal, independent retailers will benefi t


from offering eco-designed, longer-lasting goods and communicating their lifetime impact to customers. Total transparency on repair- ability, recyclability and running costs should all be part of the sales process. Surveys show that eco labels detailing energy effi ciency, material effi ciency and carbon footprint are what consumers want.


We’re entering an era of eco-design and green labelling


One exciting new addition to the updated energy labels is a QR code. Customers will be


able to scan the code with their smartphone to get further information, such as estimated lifetime costs and comparisons with other products. This is a great opportunity to give customers access to a huge array of helpful information and support. At Crystal Doors, we’re exploring how we might use this or similar technology to enable customers to register their product and access useful information, such as environmental impact, recyclability and end-of-use options.


Back to school This is the future we should be heading into and the stakes could not be higher. The world is burning, waste is fi lling our oceans and habitats are being wiped out. Ethical practice is a top priority for business resilience. Consumers are demanding action from businesses to reduce collective consumption of resources. We’re all beginning to learn that using less and making ‘lower carbon’ decisions


is an incredible


opportunity, not a loss in quality of life. A few small changes will go a long way. Perhaps, like the energy label, it’s time to go back to school and be graded from A to G on the true value of what we buy and sell.


8


Roca Group acquires Brazilian sanitaryware plant for €16 million


ROCA GROUP has strengthened its presence in Brazil with the acquisition of a sanitaryware plant in the north-east of the country.


Roca paid €16 million (£14m) for the plant, located in the state of Cerea. It was previously owned by CSC, which fi led for bankruptcy in 2018. It brings Roca’s total number of factories in Brazil to 11. Roca acquired assets comprising an industrial plant of 37,000sq m plus the 122,000sq m of land where it is located. The plant is close to the Port of Pecem and is in one of Brazil’s top regions for economic growth. Roca said that as part of its strategy to contribute to the economic growth of countries where it operates, it will create 270 jobs at the plant, which has been closed since April last year. Roca expects the plant to be fully operational by February 2022. The newly-acquired factory is said to have a production capacity of 1.4 million pieces a year and it will be dedicated to making sanitaryware for the group’s brands, which it will export to central and North America.


The plant is said to be one of the most modern in its segment and Roca will implement its EcoRoca sustainability programme there to reduce emissions, save energy and ‘revaluate’ waste. Commenting that the acquisition underlined the company’s commitment to Brazil and the American continent, Roca Group chief executive Albert Magrans, said: “This acquisition strengthens and enhances our growth in Brazil, one of our most important markets and one with high demand for bathroom products, while reinforcing our global leadership in sanitaryware.”


JJO opens £750,000 one-stop trade shop


JJO IN Lancashire has opened a new £750,000 one-stop trade shop showroom in Rawtenstall.


and


The kitchen, bedroom and bathroom manufacturer purchased the former Jacobson Group works in Bacup Road, Cloughfold, Rawtenstall, in May 2018. Local MP Jake Berry cut the ribbon at a ceremony in December 2019 and JJO had planned to open the new facility in May last year, but the coronavirus and numerous lockdowns delayed the opening until now. Called Marshall House, the new building


houses the trade shop – formerly at Rossendale Interiors in Stacksteads – and has a showroom downstairs. JJO is also adding a further 5,000sq ft of displays on the mezzanine level. Said


joint managing director Stephen Greenhalgh: “We are currently carrying out


more than 500 deliveries a week nationwide, and with orders still coming in, we decided we had waited long enough and the trade shop is now open. “The new


building has a showroom


downstairs and a specially constructed mezzanine upper fl oor is being fi tted out with 5,000sq ft of displays. Opening Marshall House provides an all-round better experience for trades people, especially when they will no longer have to travel the length of the Valley.” The new facility is managed by Patrick


Wilkinson, JJO’s trade and contract sales manager. He said: “Before we opened Marshall House, trades people would have to visit various JJO sites to collect the items they needed, but now it is all under one roof. The new showroom is ideal for showing clients around and we have more space for staff.”


· March 2021


Climate


Champion Change


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