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Breeze-Eastern is known for its helicopter rescue hoist systems, which are available in AC, DC and hydraulically powered versions. “These hoists are rated and capable of lifting between 300 to 600 pounds utilizing the best operating safety system in the industry — a reactive overload clutch,” said Mike Koons, Breeze-Eastern’s director of sales.


Asked about helicopter SAR equipment advances, Koons replied, “The industry’s increased mission requirements have resulted in the demand for new and improved tools to accomplish these missions.” In response, Breeze-Eastern has designed new cable technology that “will ultimately eliminate common operational issues with the cable,” he said. “We have seen improved durability, strength, and improved rebound characteristics, all of which will result in less cable replacements. We have also designed a lighted bumper that is easily installed above the rescue hoist hook.”


Koons added, “For Breeze-Eastern, above all else, except for safety, product reliability is critical. To that end, we have improved our motors by developing a new DC brushless motor. Coupled with the new improved cable, this will vastly reduce the seemingly increasing frontline maintenance; thus reducing the overall lifecycle and direct maintenance costs of the rescue hoist system.”


“These hoists are rated and capable of lifting between 300 to 600 pounds


utilizing the best operating safety system in the industry — a reactive overload clutch,” said Mike Koons, Breeze-Eastern’s director of sales.


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