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HANGAR TALK UNMANNED


News relating to unmanned aerial systems


Honeywell and Jaunt Air Mobility to Collaborate on Urban Air Mobility Technologies


Honeywell and Jaunt Air Mobility recently signed a memorandum of understanding to define avionics, navigation, flight control, an electric propulsion system and connectivity solutions for Jaunt Air Mobility’s planned electrical vertical takeoff and landing aircraft (eVTOL). This will be Honeywell’s third collaboration with an air taxi company. It will be assisting Jaunt Air Mobility with technology that will allow its air vehicles to interact safely and efficiently, and helping the company address regulatory and business challenges of the Urban Air Mobility (UAM) segment.


As part of the agreement, Honeywell and Jaunt Air Mobility will work together to develop the technical requirements, program statement of work, and Definitive Agreement in support of Jaunt’s eVTOL demonstration program by the fall of 2021.


“This relationship will allow us to collectivity address the growing issues of modern transportation, and pave the way for UAM to


make cities less congested and more environmentally friendly,” said Kaydon Stanzione, CEO of Jaunt Air Mobility. “Honeywell’s expertise in integrated avionics, flight control systems, electric propulsion, certification, and manufacturing, combined with our reduced rotor operating speed aircraft (ROSA™) technology and design capabilities, will allow us to produce more efficient air vehicles. Together we’ll develop the quietest vehicle with the highest levels of safety compared to other aircraft in its class.”


“The vision to disrupt mobility within urban areas is one of the most exciting frontiers in modern aviation,” said Carl Esposito, president, Electronic Solutions, Honeywell. “Yet our airspace is complex, crowded and rapidly growing, making safety paramount. Honeywell and Jaunt Air Mobility deeply understand this space and share a collective focus on developing products and technologies that provide exceptional safety and operational efficiency. Together, we will address these challenges to help usher in a new mode of transportation that, ultimately, will improve how people safely and seamlessly move within our metropolitan areas.”


Combining the mass market experience on larger passenger aircraft with the specialized expertise it possesses from designing and building interiors for small business jets, Safran Cabin designed a complete, integrated cabin interior based on a common eVTOL specification. Designed to be adaptable to the varying envelopes of different OEM vehicle designs, the interior nonetheless will feel familiar to passengers as Uber seeks to make urban air travel simple, safe, and accessible to all. Designed around the mission of turning


Safran and Uber Unveil a Full-Scale Cabin Mockup Based on Vision of On-Demand Urban Air Mobility Vehicle


Safran and Uber recently presented an eVTOL cabin that will ensure a consistent passenger experience, no matter the vehicle manufacturer.


The Mission Driven Cabin is the result of months of intensive design and passenger experience studies hosted at Safran Cabin’s Design and Innovation Studio in Huntington Beach, California, as well as consultations with multiple vehicle OEMs and regulatory bodies.


40 July/Aug 2019


a typical 90-minute car ride into a 15-minute flight, the future vehicle will allow passengers to quickly travel point-to-point in crowded urban environments by going vertical.


Scott Savian, the EVP of Design and Innovation Studio – Safran Cabin says, “Through the process with Uber, we had six full-scale mockups, with multiple iterations in each one, looking at the seats, liners, and window positioning. We don’t want any excess weight or cost, but the mission also requires safety, a comfortable user experience, and a seamlessness of all the user interactions. So while the cabin may be minimal in some ways, it’s absolutely purpose-built to the mission.”


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