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release zero emissions, which means clean air for kids and the community.” California is very proactive in promoting alternative


fuels and sustainable power. The public utilities are quite supportive of electric vehicles, and the state offers significant grant money to incentivize alternate fueled systems for buses. Having this kind of cooperation is al- ways a factor for anyone considering purchasing electric vehicles. In addition, the state has a somewhat robust and growing electric charging infrastructure. Still, Abramson said he is looking for more, before the


district would buy electric vehicles. “We will not pur- chase any electric buses until the range [and] mileage are improved,” he adds. “The range of our large buses is around 200 miles, and current electric bus technology only lasts around 120 miles.” Twin Rivers is averaging between 85 and 95 miles per


full charge, according to Shannon. But many factors go into real-world range, such as if the buses are be- ing operated in hilly areas and if drivers are punching the accelerator pedals. Still, Shannon said he isn’t too concerned about the range of electric vehicles. He added that due diligence is required when purchasing the elec- tric vehicles with regard to available infrastructure. Such planning will help validate going electric.


He said that knowing where infrastructure and


charging stations exist, and where they can be placed, is crucial. Those details may also be programmed into fu- ture capital expansions, to ensure that adequate charging stations are available. Plus, Shannon noted, grants and public funding California are supporting infrastructure expansion, and to promote using electric vehicles.


Weighing In on Propane Kuba Szczypiorski, director of alternative fuels for


Blue Bird, emphasized the importance of performing comprehensive research before finding a fitting bus purchase solution. “There are many options, and the best one will depend on several factors, including potential grants for equipment , infrastructure and fueling costs, the total cost of ownership for the bus you are interest- ed in, and the specific goals of your school district,” he explained. “Our team is very knowledgeable about what is out there, and we’ve helped thousands of districts determine what works best for them.” Szczypiorski said electric buses are an option for dis-


tricts that have access to grant money, or those that seek a zero-emissions bus that requires very little mainte- nance. Nonetheless, in his view, the best, current fuel option for buses remains propane gas as their primary


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