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AMERICA’S #1 CHOICE FOR SCHOOL BUS EXHAUST SYSTEMS


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Ned Einstein. “It took a lot of kids being killed or injured to develop com- partmentalization. Then, they developed fire-retardant seat covers. When these things happen, you cannot wave a magic wand. A lot of individuals have to make enormous efforts to produce change.” Society is largely reactive. That’s the current culture. In contrast, a proac-


tive culture would have likely passed, enforced and obeyed laws ahead of tragedies—because it was the right thing to do to keep children safe.


Defining a Safety Culture The collective opinion of the experts interviewed by STN is that a safety


culture must include buy-in from everyone—from school janitors to school board members to the community, in order to be effective. “For us, it’s total awareness,” said Zach McKinney, transportation director


for Hamilton Southeastern Schools in Indiana. “Not just the awareness of our students, but also of the community. Our teen drivers, our families and the community as a whole who might pass by stopped school buses. It’s educating them on the proper way to approach a bus when they see those red lights flashing.”


Steve Krizer Sales Manager


We must use peer pressure to encourage each other


to do the right thing.” — Safety Consultant R. Leslie Nichols


Chris Dorn, a senior security analyst for Safe Havens International, said a


safety culture comes in many forms. “In the transportation world, it is a ba- sic mindset that includes vehicle safety, traffic safety and passenger safety,” explained Dorn, who was a keynote speaker at the last month’s inaugural STN EXPO Indianapolis. “For the broader school community, it means being alert to dangerous situations. Being alert to items that need repair by students, staff or anyone in the community.” Safety expert R. Leslie Nichols said that establishing a safety culture should


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See Us At Booth 143 30 School Transportation News • JULY 2019


be approached with business objectives, business outputs and performance indicators. “If people don’t want to be diligent, or if they think a safety pro- cedure or policy is inconvenient, and they don’t want to overcome their complacency, there won’t be a culture of safety,” said Nichols, a retired vice president of safety for the Boy’s & Girl’s Clubs of America. Nichols added, “We must use peer pressure to encourage each other to do


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