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June, 2019


www.us- tech.com


Rehm Expands Cooling Options for VisionXP+


Roswell, GA — In Rehm’s VisionXP+ soldering system, the soldering process does not end with the melt- ing of the solder. A stable and reli- able cooling process is particularly important for optimal soldering re- sults.


In addition to standard cooling


with four cooling modules, customers can now choose an extended cooling section, “Power Cooling Unit,” under-


the system: the process chamber does not need to be opened to do this. For gentle cooling, especially for


complex assemblies, the new “Power Cool ing Unit” can be connected to the VisionXP+. This can be implemented as an extension to standard cooling zones under a nitrogen atmosphere or as a separate, downstream module in an air atmosphere for higher cool- ing performance for insensitive ma- terials. An advantage is that


while nitrogen is needed in the process section of the con- vection unit to prevent oxida- tion, the extended cooling section no longer needs to be flooded with nitrogen, result- ing in nitrogen savings. For particularly large


Reflow soldering cooling section with adjustable fan system.


side cooling or an energy-saving cool- ing variant. With Rehm CoolFlow, Rehm offers an innovative cooling system using liquid nitrogen. The standard cooling system in-


stalled in all VisionX convection sol- dering systems consists of up to four individual cooling modules. These allow a precisely controlled cooling process, as well as individual adjust- ment of the cooling gradient. In the cooling process, the air produced by the soldering process, which is very warm, is first sucked into the lower part of the system. It is then cleaned over several


cooling modules and cooled to the de- sired temperature — typically below 68°F (20°C). The air is then blown back from above onto the assembly. The “closed-loop principle” guaran- tees a closed atmosphere cycle. The standard cooling section consists of active and passive cooling modules. The active cooling modules are sup- plied with water by a heat exchang- er. The cooling filters can be easily cleaned and serviced at the rear of


assemblies or boards with product carriers, the Vision - XP+ can also be equipped with underside cooling. The actual cooling process is identical to that of the stan- dard cooling section, but the


extracted, cleaned and cooled air flows not only from above onto the module, but also from below. Rehm also offers an energy-sav-


ing cooling variant for the VisionXP+ convection soldering system — the air is extracted at several points rather than just one. This results in gradual cooling and offers significant energy saving potential. Along with their partner Air


Liquide, Rehm has developed a cool- ing system, “Rehm CoolFlow.” The –320.8°F (–196°C) liquid nitrogen re- leases its energy in the cooling sec- tion, then evaporates and can then be used in its gaseous state for inert- ing the process atmosphere. The cool- ing water, which previously required high energy use for cooling, including cooling unit and refrigerant, is com-


pletely eliminated. Contact: Rehm Thermal Sys-


tems, LLC, 3080 Northfield Place,


Suite 109, Roswell, GA 30076 % 770-442-8913 fax: 770-442-8914 E-mail: c.kramer@rehm-group.com Web: www.rehm-group.com


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