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Famous for being beautiful, quaint, quiet, and pristine, the Netherlands is currently experiencing a fast food invasion – but who is helping to clean them up?


Virtually all of the fast-food giants in the United States of America, including Taco Bell, McDonald's, Pizza Hut, Five Guys, and Dunkin Donuts, now have branches in the Netherlands, with even more planned. In fact, Taco Bell recently announced they plan to open five new restaurants every year for the next 10 years.


The reason for this invasion? It’s the same as it is all around the world. These fast food outlets provide quick service, tasty food, all at a very cost competitive price.


However, what many of the managers of these fast food outlets soon discover is that cleaning a busy, quick service location can be a real challenge. This is according to Jamie Hunder with Spillz B.V, a distributor in the Netherlands that provides cleaning solutions, tools, and equipment for some of these fast-food outlets.


Jamie said: “Floors are one of the biggest concerns. Many of these locations start out mopping their floors twice per day in both the back of the house as well as the front. Then workers use wet/dry vacuums to extract the grease, moisture, and soil as quickly as possible.”


However, one of the big problems with this method is that the wet/dry vacuums are continually breaking down. He continued: “This is due to all the grease on the floor. It collects in the machine, clogs the filters, corrodes the inside walls, and damages [the machine’s] components."


As most cleaning professionals know, wet/dry vacuums are typically designed to vacuum up excess moisture, usually water, from a floor or similar surface. They are not intended to be regularly used to extract the types of soils, oil, and


32 | FEATURE grease found in a quick service kitchen.


Another problem is that this cleaning method for the floors – the use of mops – is just not working. Hunder added: “What they find is that the mops quickly become saturated with grease, oil and other contaminants. The [cleaning] worker soon realises they are just spreading the grease and oil over the floor, not removing them.”


To address this situation and help improve the cleanliness of fast food facilities, Hunder encourages his fast-food clients to use Kaivac's OmniFlex Dispense-and-Vac floor cleaning system. He said: "What we do is perform a demonstration to show managers how these systems work. Then we inspect the floors. What they see is that the floors are thoroughly and quickly cleaned. Actually, the entire cleaning process is surprisingly fast."


For those that do not know, Kaivac's Dispense-and-Vac cleaning system sits on a trolley bucket. As the machine is rolled over the floor, fresh cleaning solution is dispensed. For heavily soiled and greasy floors, a microfibre pad can be used to work the cleaning solution over the floor, breaking down grease and oil. The final step is extracting the moisture, grease, and soils. This leaves the floor dry almost immediately, a significant consideration in a fast food location.


Hunder concluded: "Invariably, my fast food clients quickly see the benefits of Kaivac’s Dispense and Vac system. They don't have to keep replacing wet/dry vacs, making Kaivac's dispense-and-vac system a significant cost saver as well.”


www.kaivac.com twitter.com/TomoCleaning


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