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the charity. A unique resource, it fills a significant gap in the sector and is specifically written to assist anyone suffering the immediate aftermath of a traumatic fall from height.”


Looking ahead, 2021 will see the Foundation begin work on a landmark project: creating the No Falls Charter, an initiative embodying best practice taken from existing regulations, policies, standards, guidance and a wide range of industry bodies. Intended for adoption and implementation by industry at large, it will enable companies to make a tangible commitment to height safety, and to make that commitment both transparent and demonstrable.


The key principles underpinning the No Falls Charter will be: responsible height safety; adoption of a standardised action plan; exchanging information and learning from each other; demonstrable accident prevention and, most importantly; making a measurable difference to height safety.


The most obvious way to prevent falls from height is to avoid working at height in the first place. That’s the starting point of the No Falls Charter, which will recognise the contribution that all stakeholders – including architects, designers and developers – can make in preventing falls before work on a project even begins.


Currently the charity is inviting people to share their personal stories of having suffered a fall from height and experienced its consequences. The aim is to develop a series of case histories in the ‘Shattered Lives’ section of the charity’s website that highlight the circumstances and repercussions of a fall from height. No one expects it to happen to them, says the charity, but these stories sadly prove it can.


Ray added: “With a degree of pragmatism, working at height can be carried out safely by applying common sense. It simply needs to be properly risk assessed, planned, supervised and undertaken by competent people using the right equipment.”


The Foundation publishes a free, bi-monthly e-newsletter called ‘Saving Lives’, which contains details of all the latest news and developments at the charity. The May edition is available now and includes an article by Ray Cooke on the subject of investigating falls from height. You can sign up for the newsletter at the website below.


www.nofallsfoundation.org www.tomorrowscleaning.com WINDOW CLEANING AND WORKING AT HEIGHT | 39


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