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CONTRACT CLEANING


A Lesson In Cleaning


As we all know, the cold weather this time of year can create a breeding ground for germs and illnesses – especially in schools and colleges. But Maxim FM say that, by keeping on top of cleaning tasks, the risk of catching any winter bugs can be seriously reduced.


With the winter months now in full fl ow, the threat of the common cold and winter related viruses is looming in the classrooms. Over the chilly period, it is vital that cleaning in schools and colleges is done to the highest possible standard in order to reduce the risk of catching such seasonal undesirables.


Maxim FM – the largest independent cleaning contractor in the North – urges the education sector to prioritise their cleaning needs over the next few months in order to minimise student and teacher absences by adopting the best cleaning methods to signifi cantly reduce the spread of bacteria.


According to the worldwide cleaning association, ISSA, up to a staggering 22 million school days are lost each year to the common cold and 38 million school days are lost annually to infl uenza. It is further estimated that in one school year alone, elementary pupils contract on average eight to 10 colds.


Graham Conway, Managing Director of Maxim FM said: “We understand how important education is and the need to have the cleanest possible environment in order for pupils and students to thrive. Germs are easily spread and the importance of maintaining high cleaning standards should never be underestimated – particular in the education sector – when it comes to protecting young


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people’s health and optimising their learning experience.”


It is impossible to stop a child coming into contact with germs. However, there are hygienic cleaning measures that all education facilities should be carrying out on a daily basis. Germs are easily transmitted and cold and fl u viruses can live on the surface from a few seconds right up to 48 hours, highlighting the importance of high quality daily cleans.


Analysing pupil absences from autumn last year, the Department for Education reported illness is the most common reason for absences, accounting for 58.8%. This is a large statistic which Maxim FM would like to see reduced by ensuring the highest possible cleaning standards are reached in all schools and colleges, maximising attendance levels.


As a dedicated supplier to the education sector, Maxim FM operate in strict accordance with a process


of service level agreements and key performance indicators, thus assuring measurable operational standards and the highest levels of service to their customers. Maxim FM is a modern company always looking for new and improved working methods, adopting the most sustainable cleaning approaches to educational facilities as possible.


Graham added: “At Maxim, our standards are incredibly high, with quality being of great importance. We understand the diffi culties faced by head teachers and principals, and so we provide a cost effective and personal service to suit individual needs.”


“A clean and safe learning environment helps to instil a sense of pride in pupils and students, which has been proven to lead to increased attendance.”


Based in Sunderland, Maxim FM is one of the largest employers in the North East employing over 500 staff nationwide. Their extensive educational cleaning services range from daily cleans, periodic deep cleans, kitchen, window and carpet cleans right through to painting and decorating and graffi ti and chewing gum removal.


www.maximfm.co.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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