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6 NEWS RESIDENTIAL


DLA secures £40m scheme in the centre of Sevenoaks


DLA Architecture has secured full planning consent on behalf of client Freshwater, to deliver a £40m residential-led development on Sevenoaks High Street in Kent. Chandlers Place is the proposed redevelopment of a former Tesco store to deliver new homes in the town. The regeneration project will also provide new complementary retail to the high street as well as high quality public realm connecting the town centre to the Cultural Quarter.


The development aims to transform the current one acre derelict site into an integrated public realm environment providing 104 new apartments and three retail units with an underground car park, 122 cycle bays and a broad pedestrian walkway. Council officers approved the plans, commenting that the proposal was “a well-designed building which was sustainable and would bring much needed affordable housing into the town centre.” Charles Jabre, project leader for


DLA Architecture said: “We are pleased to secure planning consent on behalf of Freshwater. Our design approach has been contextual, drawing upon the historical architecture of Sevenoaks to create a contemporary, narrative-led design response with high quality homes.” “Chandler’s Place is designed to open up the site for the local neighbourhood through the inclusion of a high-quality new public realm along the High Street and a dedicated public pedestrian route linking to the Kaleidoscope Arts centre as part of the town’s cultural quarter.”


The professional team also included


Elliot Wood as structural engineer, ESD as MEP consultants, Connect Consultants as transport planners and Freeths as planning consultants.


POST-COVID MASTERPLANNING Reimagining villages


The impact of the pandemic has led to a 126 per cent increase in people considering properties in village locations, according to a new report by architects Broadway Malyan, which also seeks to address the “environmental, economic and social issues facing rural communities of the future in the UK.”


‘Reimagined Village’ highlights the “urgent need for a rethink amongst planners, developers and local authorities to stop villages of the future becoming unsustainable and dormitory settlements that are simply not fit for purpose.” Taking inspiration from urban locations


such as Vauban in Freiburg, Germany, Broadway Malyan said it saw the ‘village of the future’ as “an effective antidote to the housing crisis, creating environmentally, socially, economically and culturally sustainable places for people to live, work and play in England and beyond.” “Although set in beautiful environments,


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many idyllic English country villages are not as environmentally friendly or economically accessible as their city counterparts,” said the firm. “Reimagined Village tackles these issues and more head on to ensure the future village is a valid economic force in its own right – connected, smart, and green, housing a diverse and healthy community of residents and businesses in a unique, attractive and genuinely sustainable setting.” The report centres on seven key elements:  Scale and size;  The village economy;  The village heart;  New village housing;  The mobile village;  The green village; and  The resilient village.


For more information and to download a copy of Reimagined Village, visit www.broadwaymalyan.com


ADF JUNE 2021


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