search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
48 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


Keystone brick slip feature lintels hold the key to well-executed brickwork


an exceptional level of detailing as part of the Station Approach development, which has been designed and based on the concept of converted Victorian railway buildings. Close to the Georgian market town of


K


Marlow, Buckinghamshire, and adjacent to a commuter branch line, ‘The Old Coal Yard’ Station Approach has been built by Bellwood Homes and features three Victorian-style buildings consisting of three, two-bedroom houses; eight, two-bedroom apartments and a one-bedroom apartment. In keeping with the Georgian, Edwardian and Victorian styles of architecture in Marlow, the housebuilder’s specification required brickwork which maintained the character and fabric of heritage buildings with Keystone Lintels able to meet the brief. Working with Bellwood Homes, Keystone’s technical engineer designed extra


eystone’s brick slip feature lintels have successfully balanced the traditional with the contemporary and brought


squeeze through the perforations and form a ‘mushroom’ on the inside, providing a mechanical lock between the steel lintel and the brick slips. The offsite economical solution did


heavy-duty brick slip feature arch lintels for ground, first and second floor openings with a 1085 mm span and 543 mm rise. Over 40 brick slip arches were manufactured by Keystone’s production team to a high quality and consistent finish. Each Hoskins Maltings Antique brick was cut to size and bonded using a BBA-approved construction adhesive to the load bearing lintels. The patented perforated lintel design of a Keystone Brick Slip Feature Lintel allowed the adhesive to


Don’t let Rusty ruin your render!


When planning an outdoor rendering project it’s important to remember to choose beads made of stainless steel or PVCu. Building requirements outlined by NHBC and LABC, only advocate the use of austenitic stainless steel or PVCu beads in all external rendering applications, anywhere in the UK. Galvanised steel beads are no longer accepted for external rendering in any situation. But don’t worry, Simpson Strong-Tie’s extensive range of beads and mesh make plastering and rendering simple. Our SAB-S Standard Angle Bead has been designed to prevent chipping and cracking to vulnerable corners. ERS-S Render Stop Bead provides aesthetic, enhanced weathering detail, along with reinforcement to resist impact damage. The PSB-S Mesh Wing Plaster Stop Bead has numerous potential applications internally and externally including those at openings, abutment of walls and for ceiling finishes. The MVB-S Movement Bead consists of two lengths of Stop Bead linked with a white PVC extrusion. For rendering and plastering made simple, download the Simpson Strong-Tie catalogue which is packed with handy tips and installation guidance… and make sure you stay away from Rusty!


01827 255600 www.strongtie.co.uk/resources Staggering success!


Water penetrating cavity wall masonry above stepped and staggered gables is controlled using approved Cavitrays. The only gable abutment system awarded European Technical


Approval is manufactured by the UK specialist Cavity Trays Ltd. The DPC tray adjusts to suit the cavity width being formed, ensuring compliancy and compatibility. Available with attached lead or synthetic flashing options, to dress over soaker or secret gutter upstands, or directly over appropriately shaped tiles.


enquiries@cavitytrays.co.uk www.cavitytrays.co.uk Convenient and paper-free


Enjoy reading ADF but find it’s not always convenient to have the printed magazine? Or has your workplace turned paper-free? The Digital Issue offers you the same content, delivered straight to your inbox and accessible via smartphone, tablet and desktop computers. Be among the first to read all the latest features, comment, interviews, and more, before the print


issue has even been delivered! What’s more, the Digital Issue includes interactive links to featured companies. Subscribe for free now.


www.subscribepage.com/adf


not require skilled bricklayers on site to replicate each traditional arch. This saved approximately labour costs of one bricklayer per arch per day and ultimately, weeks off the project build schedule. All prefabricated lintels were delivered to site and ready for final pointing in line with the phased construction plan of the three buildings being erected. The arches produced in a factory controlled environment were unaffected by torrential rain and winter- reduced daylight hours limiting productivity. This often occurs on other build schedules which leads to further delays in creating architectural features with real significance to the landscape.


01283 200 150 keystonelintels.com


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF JUNE 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84