search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
20


INTERNATIONAL FOCUS


Showcasing the latest projects from around the world – visit www.architectsdatafile.co.uk for full information


SHENZHEN TERRACES, CHINA MVRDV


AOTI VANKE CENTRE, CHINA LWK + PARTNERS


Aoti Vanke Centre, a ‘working hub’ in Hangzhou, China designed by LWK + Partners, “embraces a hybrid mode as the way forward and challenges conventional workspaces by externalising human activities to a fluid and highly permeable field of semi-outdoor space,” commented the architects. The new office complex “reinterprets the podium-tower typology” with each level of its elevated podium rotated by different amounts, creating a variety of walking spaces. The architects said: “At a time when Covid-19 has accelerated shifting trends in sustainable design and spatial relations, the programmatic stack blurs the work-life distinction and lends itself towards a smarter urban lifestyle for the next generation, promoting interactions, active engagement and sustainability.” The Centre is made up of two office towers and a podium, “perceived as the gateway of the emerging Asian Games Village of Hangzhou.” The taller T1 tower houses corporate tenants, while the shorter T2 tower features co-working space for start-ups and micro-entrepreneurs. The towers are rotated to maximise natural sunlight and views to the new commercial core by the Qiantang River. Elevating the ring-shaped podium creates a central courtyard, while the semi-public podium roof garden serves as a bridge between the two towers, “promoting symbiosis and creating networking occasions for building users.” It also allows them to pass through a double-height covered outdoor space, as well as providing a north-south shortcut across the site.


The project has LEED Gold certification from the US Green Building Council. Multi-layered greenery is implemented in the project, providing 95,521 m2


of “oxygenating breakout spaces.” Decorative fins are


installed on the tower facades to provide passive shading from direct insolation and minimise glare. Soft landscapes at the rooftop gardens provide shading to reduce solar heat gain of the building mass as a whole, and the tower roofs are capped with trellises to provide sun screening.


Construction has started on Shenzhen Terraces, a mixed-use project that forms the core of the thriving university neighbourhood in Shenzhen’s Longgang District. The project comprises a “stack of accessible plates” containing the building’s programme, and “all communication takes place on the shaded terraces to maximise public life,” said the architects. The project’s green outdoor spaces mix together with a wide variety of activities – including a theatre, a library, a museum, a conference centre, and retail – to make the site a hub for meeting, learning, leisure, culture, and relaxation.


The stacked horizontal terraces provide a “valuable contrast” to the high-rise towers all around, said the architects, but they also perform an ecological function: overhangs provide shade and the round shape promotes wind flow and natural ventilation. The edges of the terraces dip at strategic points to form connections between the various floors and to double as small outdoor auditoriums. In other places, the facades are pushed inwards to “emphasise entrances and create recognisable places within the scheme to help visitors orient themselves.” At the centre of the largest building, the terraces curve inward to form an open-air atrium. Bridges connect the buildings to “turn the second floor into a continuous route” and connect the buildings with surrounding developments.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF JUNE 2021


© Atchain


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84