search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
14


Stride Treglown PRACTICE PROFILE


Pierre Wassenaar from the top 10 UK practice speaks to Tom Boddy about how the firm’s social value ethos has sustained since its inception, and has led to it achieving a demanding business standard for inclusivity and sustainability


ince its foundation in 1953 in Bristol, Stride Treglown has grown “exponentially”; it’s now the 10th largest practice in the UK – comprising nine offices and around 330 staff members. Their expertise spans widely across several sectors, categorised into what the firm calls ‘super sectors’: civic, commercial, education, healthcare, infrastructure, residential, and technology and innovation. Pierre Wassenaar, a director at the practice, describes its structure as “a classic matrix.” All nine offices work collaboratively, bringing


S


work through the different regions and sectors, and resourcing projects as needed depending on where expertise is sitting. While this can become “quite complex,” says Wassenaar, it allows for better communication, creating an integrated, more dynamic organisation. Stride Treglown is also ‘employee-owned’, with 56 per cent of employees owning shares in the company, a number which is “increasing all the time,” says Wassenaar. He adds that this has positively impacted not only job satisfaction, but also job security.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF JUNE 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84