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Professional Services


Body language and voice • Don’t stand behind a table or lectern. It puts a barrier between you and the audience and makes you seem uninterested in genuine communication.


• Try to use plenty of open hand gestures at waist height. Make the hand gestures symmetrical most of the time.


• Make eye contact with the audience as much as possible. Scan the room regularly using a sort of wind-sceen wiper technique from side to side. Look at the outside parameters of the room you are speaking in, so that you command the whole space.


• Consider vocal variety. Think about the use of dramatic pause. You can pause before an important word to create suspense, after the word to let it sink in, or both.


• Record yourself. You may notice that your voice trails off at the end of sentences; this happens all the time in normal conversation and it doesn’t matter, but in a speech it sounds terrible. If anything slightly raise the pitch and power at the end of the sentence.


‘A common mistake is for people to make the language of their speech excessively formal’


Rehearsal The key to giving a good performance really is practice. If you want to be better than merely average, take the time to do it well. Make a list of bullet points of the things you want to


say, then improvise your piece. Focus on clarity of communication and sincerity of delivery but don’t allow your language to become unnatural. A common mistake is for people to make the language of their


speech excessively formal. This particularly happens when people write the speech before rehearsing it. Written language, particularly on business matters, is almost always more formal than spoken language. You don’t want to sound over-stuffy in your speech, so improvise it first. Your presentation is important. Take the time to get


it right and enjoy your moment in the spotlight. Your audience will thank you for it - and you’ll feel great.


quote


FoLMay2020 for a 25% discount


Introducing the Fundamentals of Leadership Online programme.


A 12-week programme aimed at giving new managers the confidence to lead and existing managers the opportunity to refresh and build their skills.


There are eight live sessions run on Fridays at 12 noon UK time in two four- week blocks. All sessions are recorded so you can listen in your own time if you can’t attend live.


Each webinar will have content specific to developing your leadership skills with two 121 coaching sessions included and a four-week break in between the two blocks of live sessions to practice what you have learnt.


You’ll get webinar notes, a workbook and activities to help you think through the points discussed, apply them with your team and create an action plan. You’ll also be part of a private Facebook community for the duration of the programme – a great place to ask questions, get advice, share information and get support.


All of this for only £795.00 book before 31.5.2020 for 25% off.


For more information on the programme and its content please visit: www.beanstalklearning.org


48 CHAMBERLINK May 2020


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