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February 26, 2020 - Lethbridge Sun Times/Shopper - page 39 SUN TIMES/SHOPPER


Take time to celebrate your freedom to read Plan to


Submitted by Lethbridge Public Library F


eb. 23–29 is Freedom to Read Week, an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed under the Charter


of Rights and Freedoms. According to the Freedom to Read week website


(freedomtoread.ca): “Even in Canada, a free country by world standards, books and magazines are banned at the border. Schools and libraries are regularly asked to remove books and magazines from their shelves. Free expression on the Internet is under attack. Few of these stories make headlines, but they affect the right of Canadians to decide for themselves what they choose to read.” The Lethbridge Public


Library encourages you to celebrate your freedom to read: fiction, non-fiction, graphic novels, magazines, newspapers … whatever your preference, it all counts! Visit the library during Freedom to Read Week to pick up an old favourite or explore something new. Here are a few books, that were at one time or another


banned in different parts of the world, to get you started: “American Psycho” by Bret Easton Ellis — Sale and


purchase was banned in the Australian State of Queensland. Now available in public libraries and for sale to people 18 years and older. Sale restricted to persons at least 18 years old in the other Australian states. “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” by Maya Angelou


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— One of the most challenged books in the world, it was first banned in 1983 by the Alabama State Textbook Committee because the work preaches “bitterness and hatred against whites.” “Animal Farm” by George Orwell — Often banned in


high schools throughout the world. Animal Farm has also been banned due to its anti-Stalinist and totalitarianistic views that could inspire new communist rebellions. “The Autobiography of


Malcolm X” by Malcolm X — Objectors have called this seminal work a “how-to- manual” for crime and decried because of “anti- white statements” present in the book. “50 Shades of Grey” by E.L.


James — The entire trilogy was banned in Malaysia from 2015 for containing “sadistic” material and “threat to morality.” “The Canterbury Tales” by


Geoffrey Chaucer — Banned from U.S. mail under the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act (Comstock Law) of 1873,


which banned the sending or receiving of works containing “obscene,” “filthy,” or “inappropriate” material. “The Da Vinci Code” by Dan Brown — Banned in


September 2004 in Lebanon after Catholic leaders deemed it offensive to Christianity. “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky


— Challenged for references to drugs, alcohol and smoking, for offensive language and being sexually explicit. Visit your Lethbridge Public Library for these titles and for even more choices talk to our library staff.


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