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Just Chillin! “Oopsie Rolls,” Bombyx mori, & Autumn Fun!


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rable. Children, of all ages, hap- pen to love them. Te magical, colorful legends spin us away to far-away lands and of- ten make-be- lieve, the ul- timate escape from here and now. More than 5,000 years ago, the Chi-


F


nese Emperor Shennong is said to have discovered tea from tea leaves on burning twigs that floated from the hot air of the fire and landed in his cauldron of boiling water. He tasted the first cup of tea! Shennong is venerated as the “Father of Chinese Medi- cine.” He determined that tea can act as an antidote against some seventy poisonous herbs. It is also believed that he introduced the technique of acupuncture. Also known as Wuguxiandi, his many credits include being honored as a mythical, sage ruler of prehis- toric China. Everybody likes tea on blustery autumn days, espe- cially with lemon and honey. Another dropping-into-my-tea-


cup legend is that of Leizu, one of the Yellow Emperor’s wives, the Empress Xi Lingshi, known as Leizu. While drinking tea by a mulberry tree, a silk cocoon—or Bombyx mori—fell into her cup. Picking it out, she discovered she could wrap the silk thread around her finger. Spotting the small larva, she realized that was the source of the silk. Sericulture is what they have called the prac- tice of breeding silkworms for the production of silk for 5,000 years in China, then spreading to In- dia, Korea, Japan and the West. Ghandi advocated for the use of only wild silkmoths. And what could go with the tea


and honey? Why not check out Vered DeLeeuw’s blog that reveals a lot of “healthy recipes.” Watch- ing out for her husband’s and her


by Ellie Schmidt of Santa Rosa, CA. ~ eschmidt@upbeattimes.com


olk tales, fairy tales and myths are always delightful and many are truly memo-


own medical needs, clever Vered concentrates on presenting a lot of recipes that have little or no sugar, flour or much salt. Here is her “Oopsie Rolls”—a no-carb, bread substitute. For 6 “rolls” you’ll need: Nonstick cooking spray; 3 large eggs; 1/8 tspn cream of tartar; 3 oz. of soſtened cream cheese; and 1/8 tspn salt.


Directions: Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Use parchment paper to line a cookie sheet. Spray lightly. 1. Separate eggs, no yolk in the whites. Place whites in clean bowl. 2. With clean electric whisk, whip egg whites and cream of tartar un- til stiff.


3. In separate bowl, combine and whisk: yolks, cream cheese, salt, until smooth. 4. With spatula, gently fold egg whites into cream cheese mixture, working in batches. Lifting and folding gently to maintain the light air bubbles.


5. Spoon 6 large mounds of mix- ture onto prepared baking sheet. Gently press top of each mound to slightly flatten.


6. Bake about 30 minutes until golden brown.


7. Cool a few minutes before trans- ferring to wire rack.


8. Oopsie rolls are best eaten when freshly made. They do not store well. Using almond flour, Vered De- Leeuw proudly presents her


Keto Biscuits for 6 biscuits, you’ll need 1 large egg; ¼ c sour cream; ¼ tspn sea salt; 1 cup blanched finely ground almond flour (not meal)—4 oz.


Directions: 1.


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheet with parchment pa- per.


2. In medium bowl, whisk together egg, sour cream, salt. With spatula, mix in almond flour,


then baking powder.


3. Using 2 tblspn scoop, place 6 mounds of dough on prepared baking sheet. Do not flatten these mounds.


4. Bake until golden. About 15-18 mins. Serve warm.


More fun in the kitchen is to try what today is called “hacks.” If you have a clogged drain, think back to the first time you saw a teacher demonstrate “volcanoes.” Pour ¼ c salt then a ¼ c of bak- ing soda down that nasty clogged drain. If you add a ¼ c white vin- egar, that volcano will clear that drain!


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It is better to look ahead and prepare than to look back and regret. ~ Jackie Joyner-Kersee UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • SEPTEMBER 2019 • Pg 5 Changing the subject radically:


a Happy Birthday shout-out to my still going strong Professor Eric Bentley, born on September 14, 1916 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. Amazingly active still as a theater cr i t ic, s ch o l a r, translator, playwright, performing mu s i c i a n , and lionized Columbia Uni- versity


sor, he is nearly 103 years old!


profes- I


have the distinct feeling that he cer- tainly is trying to reach (another Co- lumbia U. mentor of mine) at


least the ...continued on page 27


Weird Facts & Trivia - 2 FOOD, HISTORY & A LITTLE MORE!


In 1963, major league baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry remarked, "They'll put a man on the moon before I hit a home run." On July 20, 1969, an hour after Neil Armstrong set foot on the surface of the moon, Perry hit is first, and only, home run while playing for the San Francisco Giants.


The first World Series was played between Pittsburgh and Boston in 1903 and was a nine-game series. Boston won the series 5-3.


Pete Rose, who played for the Cincinnati Reds and then was banned from baseball for life for betting on games while managing the team, holds the all-time record for hits (4,256) and games played (3,562).


The National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum is located in Cooperstown, N.Y. It was created in 1935 to celebrate baseball's 100th anniversary.


The Fastest, Best Omelettes in Sonoma County Since 1977!


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