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Bembridge Harbour evolution continues...


“A very special and unique place” is how many visiting boat owners describe Bembridge Harbour. “A safe and secure haven with the most wonderful vistas” is another description


quality and/or increase the quantum of showers and toilets at both the main marinas, together with a new admin/berthing office; this will then be followed by 13 new houses overlooking the Harbour - some with views across the Solent to the mainland.


The East Wight, at the head of one of the gateways into the Solent - renowned as the mecca of world yachting - is one of the quieter parts of the Island, with such an abundance of charm that those lucky enough to live there or visit are truly spoilt, with wonderful walks and bike rides, stunning views and beaches, real ‘pubs’, and cafes and restaurants serving first class Island grown produce, including locally caught crabs and lobsters. To watch the fishing boats return to their berths and their catch being unloaded is always a fascinating experience.


Bembridge Harbour itself is the sole East Wight port and anchorage, and offers the friendliest of welcomes to every visiting boat. A business which prides itself on its ‘can do’ attitude, whether from the Harbour staff themselves, or in conjunction with local boatyards and marine businesses. On a sunny, breezy day, racing and sailing from the 2 sailing clubs based in Harbour guarantees a plethora of sails and colourful spinnakers.


Since the new owner managers - now in their 8th year - took over, financial investment has been continuous, with a variety of mooring and berthing offers to suit all budgets, a renewed dredging programme, on-going shoreside improvements, including installation of an additional electrical supply to meet the demands of today’s boats, new hardware this season to improve WiFi coverage which has enabled a free service to be offered, and a licence for the ‘Galley Locker’ at the Duver Marina so that locally made wines, beers, ales and spirits can be included as part of their showcase of what the Island has to offer.


The latest innovation is an ongoing plan to provide sewage treatment facilities within the houseboat community, at the Harbour’s cost; this is likely to take a few years to achieve and is a hugely worthwhile project.


After extensive delays it looks as though the new admin and facilities complex will gain a long awaited planning approval to improve the


Bembridge Harbour Authority, Harbour Office, The Duver, St Helens, Isle of Wight PO33 1YB tel: 01983 872828 email: office@bembridgeharbour.co.uk facebook.com/bembridgeharbour website: bembridgeharbour.co.uk


spencewillard.co.uk


The owners are determined to bring Bembridge Harbour into the 21st century, creating facilities for visiting and resident boats that compare and compete with harbours and marinas throughout the Solent and the south coast, whilst remaining sensitive to the harbour’s uniquely special and protected environment.


Many people are involved in the working life of the Harbour, adding their own style and input to the overall mix. For most boat owners, their boat is their most prized asset - the Harbour team both recognise and respect the importance of ensuring a memorable visit to Bembridge.


Owners Fiona and Malcolm Thorpe truly believe in the direction in which they are guiding this beautiful Harbour - they like to think that the sun always shines in Bembridge - well, that’s nearly right!


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