search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 32 YEARS PERCY HOUSE GALLERY


COCKERMOUTH HERITAGE GROUP NEWS WITH GLORIA EDWARDS


A small group of us recently spent time in Cockermouth’s residential homes, recording people’s memories. Some of the memories we were able to capture, related to people’s experiences as children during WWII and we are looking for more of those memories.


New Works for Summer


PERCY HOUSE GALLERY 38-42 Market Place, Cockermouth


01900 829 667


Beautiful layered textiles (above) by Judith Reece, form part of the ‘Summer Selection’ at Percy House. Each piece is layered, stitched, cut, torn and burnt to allow the colours to emerge.


New scarves by textile artist Diane


Jones have just


arrived. Diane creates one- off fabrics using the Devoré technique, in which parts of the velvet are dissolved to create a pattern.


The scarves (pictured left) are then


hand-painted paintings in


beautiful array of colours. New


a include Percy House


watercolours by Francis Winder, oils by John Fowler and acrylics by Alan Richmond.


Proving very popular, are the locally made Goat’s Milk Soaps produced from goats Eunice and Blue. Each fragrance-free soap is ideal for sensitive skin.


www.percyhouse.co.uk


Cockermouth Art & Craft 


  





                                                  


  INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


 


          


                      


Members of the Home Guard (WWII)


One man, who grew up in Flimby, happened to be talking one day to the signalman on the railway at Flimby. He was ten years old and became aware of a droning noise. He looked up to see a German bomber with a Swastika painted on the side flying very low over his head. He was aware of the pilot looking down at him, so close that he could see a half-smile on his face. A short while afterwards there was a bang, the pilot having discharged his load of bombs and the house of the Howard family was flattened – ten people were killed and the year was probably 1942. The pilot had been aiming for the ammunition dump at Broughton Moor but had missed his target. Later, the pilot would write to the Mayor of Maryport to apologise for what had happened. The same interviewee recalls the horrors of the War as experienced by a family friend who had been held captive in a Japanese POW camp and was so traumatised by his experiences that the least sound was enough to cause terror. This man lasted only twelve months after his return home. It is sobering to remember that there were many people like him, who did not die in the fighting but who were so traumatised, that they were unable to return to their everyday lives again.


Other interesting stories came from a husband and wife: the husband was a child in Docklands, London during WWII, whilst his wife was living in what was then Cumberland. Their two


accounts show the contrast between what was happening in this relatively peaceful part of the world and the intense bombing campaign taking place in the capital. Everyone experienced rationing, of course but here in Cumberland there was no shortage of vegetables, some fruit, and being a country area – access to sources of food on farms and from poaching. Here in school in Cumberland, the teacher had a map of Europe covered in brown paper where territory had been taken over by German troops and every time a part was liberated, the children were able to cut off the brown paper, so that way, they were aware of what was


happening in Europe.


Things were very different in London: the nearby hospital, St. Dunstan’s Road Hospital (now Charing Cross Hospital) took a direct hit. Many patients were killed, and other patients had to be cared for on mattresses outside because there was nowhere else for them to go. King George VI and his wife came to visit and shook hands with everyone. The local school got hit too and the children didn’t go to school for a whole year. The children played in the rubble, collecting bits of shrapnel and bombs, which they would swap with each other. On one


Collecting scrap metal for the war effort


sad occasion, a friend’s house completely disappeared overnight and with it, all trace of a childhood friend.


We’d like lots more of these stories relating to WWII: please get in touch if you, or anyone, have memories to share.


Gloria


01900 823966 • cockermouthheritagegroup@outlook.com www.cockermouthheritagegroup.org.uk


ISSUE 432 | 20 JUNE 2019 | 14


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48