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State College offers an exciting nightlife, theater, historic shopping dis- tricts, museums, attractions and con- certs. Outdoor activities include near- by cycling and running trails, golf courses, plus fishing and kayaking.


Abundant beauty surrounds visitors in upstate New York’s Southern Adirondacks region, where the Lake George Area is situated. Nature is alive in the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, where the largest park in the nation encompasses more than six- million acres.


Adirondack Park is the largest publicly protected area in the United States (greater in size than Yellowstone, the Everglades, Glacier and Grand Canyon National Park combined). Nearly half the park belongs to the people of the state and is a protected “forever wild” forest preserve. The rest is private land that includes settlements, farms, timber- lands, businesses, homes and camps.


“Groups can enjoy spectacular lake, river and mountain scenery as nature inspires their meetings,” said special events and convention sales director for the Lake George Regional Chamber of Commerce and CVB, Kristen Hanifin. “The Lake George Area offers a variety of activities for all adventure levels, from hiking and zip lining to water recreation and winter sports.”


Attendees may want to extend their business trips and make it a long week- end or return for a vacation because there’s so much to do. Hiking or driv- ing to a summit, such as Prospect Mountain in Lake George, provides the reward of a 100-mile view. Stopping for farm-to-table cuisine and sipping craft beverages can be a great way to unwind while whetting the appetite.


The Lake George Area features a com- bined 200,000-square feet of flexible indoor and outdoor meeting space. No matter what setting groups are seeking,


they’ll find it - from an outdoor picnic space to a lavish indoor room with a breathtaking view.


Several unique and historic outdoor spaces are available, as the area is rich in French and Indian War and Revolutionary War era history.


There are a variety of properties and venues available year round in the area, such as: a rooftop terrace over- looking Lake George at the Courtyard Marriott, which lies in the heart of walkable Lake George Village; the his- toric space at the Fort William Henry Resort; the privacy and exclusiveness of the elegant Sagamore Resort; the hip, art deco-inspired and newly reno- vated Queensbury Hotel in Glens Falls; a new space at the Silver Bay YMCA in Hague at the northern end of 32-mile- long Lake George (dubbed the Queen of American Lakes); and Great Escape Lodge, which offers conference space along with an indoor waterpark.


Let’s Meet in State College!


• 190,000 Square Feet of Meeting Space


• 3600 Guest Rooms • Affordable Meeting Space


• Diverse Dining & Entertainment Opportunities


• Convenient Access to I-80, I-99 and 322


• Trade Show Space at the Bryce Jordan Center for 375 Exhibitors


• RFP Distribution, Complimentary Site Visits


No matter how many times you’ve visited State College, home to Penn State University, we always have a surprise for you. See our shows. Explore our museums. Sample the local flavors. The ideal place to get started is atMeetinStateCollege.com. You can also call us at 814-231-1401.


Mid-Atlantic­EvEnts Magazine 31


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