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Simon Glendenning of Dugdale Bros


CHANGING CLIMATE


Every cloth merchant that Savile Row Style spoke to agrees that customers want lighter fabrics to cope with our changing climate. What would have been considered a sturdy tweed jacket would have been standard suiting back in the Fifties. Thirty years ago, 9oz was considered lightweight but today people wear 8oz cloth all year round. The latest generation of Italian Super 200s weigh as little as 6oz. Norton & Sons says that when fathers


accompany their sons into the tailors, often the parent will opt for a heavier 15-16 oz cloth while the son will stick at 11-12ozs. Predominantly this is because the British climate is changing. “All the American market wants is rather nasty lightweight


Tailors, he says, dislike such lightweight cloth because it’s so difficult to work with.


‘Making a garment that lasts is the best thing for the environment’


cloths because they move from air conditioned car to a temperature controlled office, which suits the ‘non-climate climate’ they live in,” says Dugdale Bros managing director Simon Glendenning.


26 SAVILE ROW STYLE MAGAZINE


INNOVATIVE FABRIC That as is maybe, cloth merchants have had to respond with innovative lightweight fabrics. Huddersfield Fine Worsteds recently


launched a bamboo bunch at a 9oz weight in 34 colours. Clients include Henry Poole and Norton & Sons. Touching the swatch book, the bamboo cloth has a lovely feel, like lightweight cashmere. Wheeler had a blazer made up in the material that he calls “the best


jacket I’ve ever worn, so soft feeling yet warm”. “I’m a great believer in this range,” says Cundey. “It gives the


impression of a relaxed linen look as a suiting or a dress blazer with distorted fibres or a white tuxedo.” “Bamboo is no different from a linen range,” says Glendenning. “The fact is that it’s been brought to the West recently and it’s


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