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Savile Row has responded to climate change with lighter fabrics and reducing its carbon footprint. In fact, the Row was sustainable decades before the word was invented, says SRS


M


aking textiles from plant-based fibres is nothing new. In fact, the very first fabric produced in England during the Bronze age textiles was made from the bark of lime trees. Today, cloth merchants which supply Savile Row are


experimenting with plant-based fabric in keeping with the drive towards sustainability. Savile Row tailors, mindful of climate change, are working with


ever-lighter cloths while keeping an eye on their carbon footprint, sourcing material from within Britain from merchants which can prove their ethical credentials. The fashion industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon


24 SAVILE ROW STYLE MAGAZINE


emissions and remains the second largest industrial polluter, second only to oil. Cotton production is particularly damaging to the environment


if not done properly with untreated water poured back into rivers. People’s shopping habits have changed. Online customers order


cheap clothes only to throw them away months later – so-called “fast fashion”. Of course, Savile Row is the opposite of fast fashion. By its very


nature, working in a bespoke manner and using limited amounts of cloth, a sturdy tweed suit made in Savile Row can be handed down from father to son.


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