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COVER STORY


pening my inky copy of that week’s NME in the Eighties and reading about Bryan Ferry emerging from Antony Price’s boutique on the King’s Road, it


ineffably stylish it all seemed. It was a long


is difficult to convey how way


from the lead sky and the gasometer of the Midlands town I grew up in.


Surprisingly then, Antony Price, the man who has been called the most criminally overlooked designer in British fashion, turns out to be a warm Yorkshireman also from the provinces. Today, he still dresses the Duchess of Cornwall,


who remains one of his most loyal clients. Other clients have included Naomi Campbell, Diana Ross, Melanie Griffith and Anjelica Huston. Standing in front of a dressing table, readying himself for our photo shoot, Price appraises himself. The triple pleats on his three-piece checked suit trousers are so exquisite, they make me want to cry. Often his innovations take years to work their way into the mainstream and the high street.


“I’m always ahead of the game and I know that I’m


right,” he says without a trace of pomposity. Price reinvented the suit in the Seventies, taking it out of the office and making it rock ‘n’ roll. The look he developed was a little bit military, a little bit Dietrich. “Suits really appeal to women, not men,” he says, “because a suit says success”. His most famous collaboration was with Bryan


Ferry, where his retro futurism perfectly suited the big- band, ray-gun sound of Roxy Music. His King’s Road shop was even namechecked in Ferry’s song Trash. There is something magical about Antony Price. Hurrying


after him in Brocket Hall


where the photo shoot is taking place, I feel like Alice trying to catch up with the dashing White Rabbit. He has the energy of a thirtysomething. What Price would also love to do is design a menswear collection for a traditional Savile Row tailor. “I do wish a Huntsman or a Kilgour would get me in. I understand completely the business they’re in and the constraints they’re under because I have spent my life selling clothes. “Not only am I a designer, I am a master pattern


cutter. I make patterns for everything I’ve ever done. It’s about shaping and cutting because you can’t alter the basics of a revere collar and a set-in sleeve. I do like to work with other houses whenever possible.” Price says that a man’s jacket is one of the most


complicated pieces to manufacture because it involves so many elements.


MANUFACTURE BECAUSE IT INVOLVES SO MANY ELEMENTS


JACKET IS ONE OF THE MOST COMPLICATED PIECES TO


A M❝AN’S ❞ SAVILE ROW STYLE MAGAZINE 19


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