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SUSTAINABLE


Simon Cundey, managing director of Henry Poole, says:


“Rather than fast fashion ordered daily over the internet, a Savile Row customer will order just twice a year, typically a pair of suits and a couple of sports jackets.” Geoff Wheeler of Huddersfield Fine Worsteds agrees: “It’s fast


fashion that’s doing the real damage. Bespoke is the way forward because it’s a purchase that you keep for a long time. Making a garment that lasts is the best thing for the environment compared to the damage done by throwaway garments.”“We wouldn’t consider the products we make to be ‘fashion’, so they’re not thrown away into landfill once they fall out of favour,” says Emmanuel Guegan, head of accessories at Purdey. “What’s durable is sustainable.” Because Savile Row deals with bespoke, the amount of


wastage is far less than you get with fast fashion. Again, the drive towards using natural fibres in Savile Row is nothing new: Awareness of natural fibres such as wool, linen


and cashmere has been part of the Row’s DNA. It’s not only suit materials in Savile Row that are sustainable


but the way suits are made – with interlinings stitched together and not glued as with cheaper suits. One thing that Norton & Sons has been thinking


‘Bespoke tailoring is at the


very top of sustainable fashion producers in terms of the footprint it leaves’


about is what to do with offcuts of cloth that are left over. Although New York-based Fabscrap that recycles offcuts and reweaves fibres from tailors such as Kozinn + Sons or uses it to stuff furniture, mattresses and pillows, this is a trend that has yet to arrive here. Younger customers are increasingly


interested in authenticity, quality and provenance – all of which fits in neatly with the Savile Row ethos. “In the last decade, there’s been a drive towards sustainability,”


says Cundey. Wheeler believes there will be a reaction to our throwaway culture, with customers unafraid to spend more on clothes with durability.


SAVILE ROW STYLE MAGAZINE 25


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