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and the modern woman. Diamonds,


F


Emeralds, Pearls or us proud and stately British, jewellery has always been


an integral part of who we are. Although fine jewels were historically worn in India more by men rather than women as a sign of virility and strength, in recent years, the inner strength of women rather than men has been seen in traditional jewellery purchases across auction houses. Companies like Cartier and Van Clef and Arpels was in part built by the love of jewellery by Indians. Nowadays, the famous Cartier five row natural pearl necklaces worn by the Maharajas of yesteryears now find an elegant place on ladies, showing the transition of power from the man to the modern woman. Even though funds have to be cleared by the man at times, the woman is today pivotal in making th


these substantial purchase decisions. No longer is the patriarch supreme, it’s the matriarch that runs the family…and men have almost given up.


Some of the finest craftsmen of Indian jewellery still display their skills in Jodhpur, Udaipur and Jaipur, crafting relics for future generations to come. Here in the UK, there are some specialists still left who craft some of the finest jewellery available to the British within powerhouses like Graff. The West may have moved to fashion brands like Pandora but it seems the wealthy will always stick to “bricks and mortar”, gold


gold, diamonds, emerald, rubies natural pearls and platinum jewellery and brands like Graff, Cartier and Tiffany will always thrive. Historically, these articles have also always provided an investment vehicle of the super-rich as well.


Rare Golconda diamonds have, for centuries, been an essential part of Indian heritage, although the mine is now extinct. Similar Type IIA (the purest form of diamond) diamonds can be found in the kingdom of Lesotho within South Africa. At auction, a 20 carat Type IIA D colour Flawless diamond was sold in excess of $5m to an “Asian private” collector. Nowadays the diamond engagement ring has become central to any engagement. It is seen as a sign of commitment, strength of relationship and virility like in the olden days.


The mining company Gemfields have been in the news for mining exquisite quality emeralds and bringing it to these shores. Some of these green gems mined are of extremely deep colour and some show a very clear likeness to the “old mine” emeralds worn by the Maharajas. Although most coloured gemstones nowadays are heated or treated in some manner, if one searches hard enough, one can still find completely natural emeralds. The finest emeralds are still found in Columbia and are known for their clear deep green colour. Natural oriental, saltwater or Gulf pearls originating from the Basra region in Iraq again excite the wealthy and royalty. Prices are skyrocketing and the reason is wealthy col- lectors snapping them up at auction houses around the world. Like Golconda diamonds, the Basra pearl production is extinct and there is no other alternative to the same quality and lustre of these pearls to date. This is a one of a kind investment requiring specialist knowledge and expertise. Almost all collectors nowadays rely on expert opinion and advice to purchase. There are at times, pearl exhibitions at the V&A and other museums if someone wishes to have further knowledge of this unmatched relic. CEO’s of any major auction house like Christies and Sotheby’s lights up when they hear about important pearls coming to market and they compete against each other to get the item for themselves to sell. Such is the unprecedented demand for them that the strongest jewellery personalities get excited. This can be said of rare Kashmir sapphires, pigeon Red Burma rubies as well. Marlows Diamonds are proud to stock Golconda, Type IIA diamonds and important natural saltwater pearls among their collection of stock.


Birmingham Address


46-47 Warstone Lane Jewellery Quarter Birmingham • B18 6JJ


London Address


20 Beauchamp Place Knightsbridge London • SW3 1NQ


Contact


Birmingham: 0121 236 4415 London: 020 74051477 www.marlows-diamonds.co.uk


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