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BESPOKE LIVING C


ommissioning bespoke furniture, like that from Charles Yorke, for your kitchen or any other room in


your home, means that you are able to own something which has been individually designed and made to suit your exact requirements. Every time you use it you should notice those fine details which make it unique, whether it’s something as simple as a perfectly constructed drawer for your treasured watches or as complex as an intricate panel of inlaid veneer. From a practical perspective, bespoke


furniture is ideal if you want to create a kitchen which will completely suit your specific


provide innovative


needs. Bespoke kitchens can solutions to design


problems such as limited space or unusual structural requirements. This helps to meet the multi-tasking demands of 21st century life, whilst maintaining


the


aesthetic credentials in a way off-the-peg designs don't have the flexibility to do. When choosing a bespoke company it is


important to ensure you are comfortable with the designer and can communicate easily with them. A good designer will take a detailed brief which encompasses


not only the dimensions of the room but the requirements of your lifestyle. The resulting furniture will be tailor-made to meet those demands. Kitchens for example, are the main hub of the home, so having furniture created for the space you need can have a real impact on how you live


"Having furniture


created for the space you need can have a real impact on


how you live within your home"


within your home. Designing and fitting a bespoke kitchen can take some time and there will be a number of developmental stages where you will need to discuss the specifics and decide exactly what you want. It is important that you feel confident that the designer can interpret your ideas clearly and then represent them in the finished design.


Before meeting with the designer have a


wish list of everything you would like to include. Think about how you want the space to work. Do you need an area for a specific task? Storage for a particular item? Sometimes carrying out some research and collecting images that inspire you and those that don't, help to give the designer an idea of your tastes and style. These do not necessarily need to be just furniture – it could be other rooms, materials, colours, even a piece of art. Visiting a showroom and seeing


furniture first hand is undoubtedly important in the decision-making process. Pay close attention to the furniture on display – even if the design is not to your taste the display should tell you a great deal about the quality of the products. Charles Yorke has showrooms across


the country. Its bespoke furniture-making heritage and experience is clear in all the kitchens it produces, from the traditional style of the Edwardian kitchen, with hand- painted finishes and ornate, finely crafted details, through to the expert use of exotic veneers in more contemporary ranges. www.charlesyorke.com.


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