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L I V E 2 4 -SE V EN


A COT SWOLDS CHRISTMAS FOODIE FEAST


LewisLoves.com is a Cotswolds and South West lifestyle blog run by Adam and Sarah Lewis, sharing the very best the area has to offer. “Food is a particular passion of ours, and we can't wait to share our hidden gems with you. You can also follow us over on Twitter @adamlewisloves and Instagram @sarahlewisloves for foodie inspiration and much more besides."


With such an abundance of fabulous food and drink on our doorstep, this month we thought we'd share our perfect Christmas day feast, featuring the best the Cotswolds has to offer.


Christmas Eve It's not Christmas Eve unless you leave out a carrot for Rudolph and a whisky for Father Christmas. Treat him (and yourself ) to a tot of Cotswolds Distillery Whisky and you're guaranteed a place on the nice list this year. It'd make a great gift too so grab a second bottle and avoid any last-minute panic.


Breakfast If you've not seen Cacklebean Eggs before, you're in for a treat. The yolks are the most incredible orange and the packaging is so Instagrammable, we'd be happy to find them in our stocking. Scramble and top with some locally caught, sustainable smoked salmon from Severn & Wye Smokery for a light but delicious start to your day.


Lunch We're sure you've all got your favourite meats, veg and family traditions sorted and ready to go, so we won't try to tempt you away. But whilst the turkey's in the oven, we're going to be enjoying a festive aperitif of Sibling's Clementine and Cranberry Winter Gin mixed with Poulton Hill's award winning Bulari sparkling wine, grown near Cirencester.


Dessert It wouldn't be Christmas without a sticky, rich Christmas pudding loaded with plump raisins and a bucket load of brandy. We usually make our own using a Hobbs House


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recipe but if you've run out of time, they sell the puddings too at Stroud Farmer's Market or from their bakeries. Warm it up, dowse liberally in brandy, flambé and enjoy the post- dinner fireworks.


Cheese Board If you prefer savoury to sweet, the Cotswolds has plenty of champion cheeses to fill your fridge. Cerney Ash offer the world's best goats cheese, Cotswold Brie is meadow sweet, Single Gloucester is only made by seven producers worldwide and they're all right on our doorstep, and Rollwright is an oozy Reblochon style soft cheese wrapped in seasonal spruce bark. Delicious.


Tea Time The Queen's Speech is long finished, Dr.Who is fast approaching in her TARDIS and your family are probably snoring on the sofa. You're definitely not hungry after that massive lunch but, tradition dictates you're going to stuff yourself silly anyway! Our suggestion is a couple of thick slices of Stroud based Salt Bakehouse sourdough, freshly reheated and slathered with Cotswold butter, a stack of your finest lunch leftovers and if you like to spice things up, topped with some Tubby Tom's hot sauce. Just keep it away from your Nan unless you want to blow her Christmas socks off!


Whatever ends up on your table, have a wonderful Christmas and we’ll be back in the New Year with plenty more foodie tips and treats for you!


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