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GWENT WI LDL I F E TRUST


Barn Owl (Pete Hadfield)


Long-eared Owl – Not often seen due to their more nocturnal habits and largely being confined to the upland fringes where they nest in coniferous woods on the edge of the moors. The distinctive orange eyes and ‘long ears’ should make them unmistakable, however the ear-tufts are folded down at rest so could be mistaken for a Short-eared Owl. The young sound like a squeaky gate, so if you are walking in the uplands in the spring/summer listen out!


Tawny Owl – Our most common and familiar owl species, and the one most likely to be heard in more urban settings. The familiar t- wit t-woo call is actually a duet, the female making the ‘kee-wick’ call and the male responding by ‘hooting’.


Long Eared Owl (Pete Hadfield)


Little Owl (Pete Hadfield)


IF YOU GIVE A HOOT, PLEASE GET INVOLVED! The British Trust for Ornithology need everyone’s help for a Tawny Owl survey this winter, it simply requires listening for Tawny Owl calls for 20 minutes a week, further details and how to sign up can be found at www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/project-owl/tawny- owl-calling-survey.


To find out more about the work of Gwent Wildlife Trust please visit: www.gwentwildlife.org


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