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INTERIORS A sustainable future for water


Glenn Payne from Grohe discusses sustainable solutions for bathrooms as well as the innovations making their way into UK homes


wonderful recycling system, it is a resource that, in the western world, is taken for granted. However, when we take into consideration that there is no more fresh water on earth today than there was a million years ago, and that only 3 per cent of the earth’s water is suitable for human consumption, it becomes clear as to why the topic of sustainability has increased tenfold in recent years. To put it into perspective, the global population, which currently stands at over seven billion people, has to share this 3 per cent of usable water for washing, cooking and sanitisation. Thus there is growing urgency on demand for water, and focus on the need for manufacturers to deliver sustainable solutions for our homes, offices and public buildings to help reduce consumption, and ease the strain on nature’s purest resource.


W


International certification programmes are growing in abundance across the globe. The value that rating systems such as BREEAM and LEED can add to a project is immeasurable. Not only do they help to facilitate the sustainable construction, design or refurbishment of buildings, but they also set a benchmark of excellence, which in turn helps identify areas of improvement and inspiration for the future. The management of water currently only plays a small part in these accreditation systems – 6 per cent reduction required for BREEAM and 10 per cent for LEED – which is much less than the reductions required for energy. Is it time for change, in light of the pressures placed upon this precious resource, and the growing number of intelligent solutions available on the market?


In the fields of design and architecture, leading manufacturers are providing innovative, functional and design-centric solutions to both the residential and commercial sectors to try and alleviate some of these issues. When it comes to


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


ater – our most natural resource, spans 70 per cent of the planet’s surface. Thanks to nature’s


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considering sustainable solutions in residential properties, it is important to find water-reducing products that address the daily activities that cause the biggest deficit. A similar thinking can also be applied to many public and commercial buildings too. Interestingly, a fifth of the daily water used in an average household is consumed in the kitchen, but only 2 per cent of this is for drinking and cooking. A staggering 32 per cent is used for toilet flushing alone, and 36 per cent for washing, bathing and showering. As the three biggest contenders for water consumption, and consequently, wastage, these are the areas that sustainable developments should consider tackling with more eco-friendly solutions.


The integration of smart water systems will allow consumers to track consumption, detect micro leaks and frost risk, and in case of a detected burst pipe, automatically shut off the water supply


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