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50 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


A Flood-Proof Waterproofing Solution for Your Home


storms Desmond, Eva and Frank wreaked havoc on over 16,000 residential homes. Newton Waterproofing examines how cavity drainage systems can assist those who are recovering from, or facing the threat of flooding.


I


Cleanup The greatest challenges following a flood are to make damaged properties fit for


n recent years the UK’s winter storms have been a firm reminder of the threat posed by flooding. In 2015 especially,


reoccupation, and to protect them from future flooding. However, one of the biggest delays in


the cleanup is the need to allow saturated walls to dry out. This can be as slow as one month per inch of wall thickness, and cannot begin until all contaminated materials are removed and a ‘Decontaminated Building and Sanitation Certificate’ has been issued.


Recovery Speeding up this process is therefore a crucial part of any effective flood management strategy, and internal cavity drainage systems are perfect for the role. The cuspated waterproofing membranes create an air gap between the membrane and the wall, providing two major benefits: • Separating the damp wall from the internal environment, allowing new surfaces and finishes to be installed immediately


A 3D cross-section of a typical Newton CDM System


• Creating positive vapour pressure that ‘moves’ dampness out of the property. As


vapour moves from the inside to the outside in an attempt to equalise, damp in the walls is also moved outwards


Reoccupation and Remediation Cavity drainage systems maintain the structure while protecting internal environments, allowing new finishes to be applied with peace of mind, and enabling reoccupation significantly earlier than if the walls were required to dry out naturally. Finally, cavity drainage systems also


protect properties against future flooding, forming an integral part of an overall flooding solution.


01732 496511 www.newtonwaterproofing.co.uk


Roofshield preserves the character


A historic farmstead conversion in Westmarch, Dundee is set to benefit from the added protection of Roofshield, which has long been recognised as one of the highest performing roofing membrane solutions, providing a pitched roof underlay,which is both air and


vapour permeable. Jason Stewart of Circinn Developments comments: “It was important to maintain a strong traditional character to the buildings, preserving the stone finish exterior and slate roof. As part of the roof construction, we insisted on the Roofshield membrane from the A. Proctor Group to ensure the highest level of protection.”


01250 872261 www.proctorgroup.com Structural solution helps cut costs


A survey and design exercise has helped reduce costs and transform a disused mill into a luxurious new residential accommodation building. Rhodes & Partners undertook the work on the Grade II listed building, and devised a solution which helped minimise


the need for costly temporary work by utilising as much of the original structure as possible. Rhodes & Partners’ Technical Director, Peter Graham explains: “Part of the structure had suffered a high degree of deflection, but we were able to design a detailed system of cross-bracing which stabilised the building and allowed the refurbishment to proceed.”


0161 427 8388 www.rhodesandpartners.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


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