search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
40 PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS


It was important to Medical Architecture that the building had the right look and feel in order to steer clear of the more traditional institutional aesthetics


gestation of the design.” However, obeying this constraint was actually another factor in seeing the project get underway. “The cost, based on the floor area, was an important driver towards getting the project off the ground, giving the existing health services in Hull confidence to sign up to the new model,” says Yeomans.


A thoughtful layout It was important to Medical Architecture that the building had the right look and feel in order to steer clear of the more traditional institutional aesthetics. “Reducing the ‘hospital’ feel was important,” says Yeomans, giving the example of entering through a cafe space “which is convenient for waiting between consultations and helpful for orientation within the building.”


The ICC was intentionally built in an area with a high older adult population so that the services would be “on their doorstep”. Says Yeomans, “A visit to hospital is a traumatic experience, so the easy access was one way to reduce the stress of engaging with the health service.” The architects had to ensure the building itself was fully accessible, and could be easily navigated by its elderly patients. The


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


simplest way to ensure easy access for all patients – including wheelchair users and those arriving on hospital beds – was to locate all services they would need on the ground floor.


The building is arranged, in a “pinwheel formation” around the reception/cafe area. “By organising the welcoming point at the heart of the low rise building, all the clinical and support functions are nearby and accessible,” he says.


This layout means a patient can attend a planned consultation, during which necessary tests are taken. The analysis can then take place elsewhere, and results can be ready the same day. When a wait is necessary, “comfortable and convenient” waiting areas are available – also beneficial to any carers who may be accompanying patients. “This process might take several visits over a period of weeks in a hospital setting, but can be dealt with in a day at the Jean Bishop ICC,” Yeomans explains.


The practice also employed “thoughtful internal finishes” to help with navigation. Says Yeomans, these “address colour contrast/dementia issues, but are also part of a robust wayfinding strategy that assists the visitor to find their way into the


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84