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28 PROJECT REPORT: HOTELS, RESTAURANTS & BARS


© Ivan Dupont


The most arresting aspect of the overall form is the three massive voids carved from the centre of the block, turning the building into a hybrid of a solid volume and two towers connected by two


organically-shaped bridges


“This is something the office has been researching quite a bit in other projects, making the presence of the skyscraper recognisable if you are sitting under it.” Another more practical driver was that the designers were confronted with a requirement for 150,000 m2


gross floor


area, within a footprint of 99 metres x 52 metres, and a height restriction of 160 metres with Macau airport being nearby. While the facade deliberately obscures the fact due to the web of aluminium-clad steel exoskeleton wrapping the entire exterior, there is in fact a podium within. This consists of four levels including the main lobby and gaming areas, which connect to other parts of the resort, retail and a spa (containing ‘real’ snow). Muscettola comments that the client had key requirements for this area: “It had to be porous while having enough footprint, giving enough visual connection between the different programmes.”


The most arresting aspect of the overall form is the three massive voids carved from the centre of the block, turning the building into a hybrid of a solid volume and two towers connected by two organically- shaped bridges. While achieving the straightforward requirement of bringing light into a deep-planned building, this also creates a sculptural presence in the city inspired by the Chinese art of jade carving.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


There is something of the sense of a futuristic, avant-garde arch, but in fact the building has a genuinely unique aesthetic. The dynamically undulating glass facades also provide hotel and restaurant guests with exciting and unusual views of the building’s structure from within. This keeps them engaged with the building’s distinctive nature, and provides a new and unique visual backdrop for many rooms, ameliorating what are otherwise fairly mediocre external views. Muscettola says that for the client it was “important to make people want to explore the inside of the hotel they are in, rather than leaving to go somewhere else.” She says that the idea of “carving out” the core was present in the very first sketches, and are essential to how the hotel is a “a place of continual discovery” for visitors. This discovery starts at the 40 metre atrium, continuing to a pair of glass lifts which run up the sides of the voids, then to the two bridges at level 21 and level 30 which house restaurants, and finally the swimming pool in a sunken terrace on level 40.


The diagrid-formed structural exoskeleton becomes free-form to clad the curving glass facades of the voids, but also has an architectural role on the flat sections of the building. It becomes increasingly less dense as the building ascends, for structural


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


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