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INSULATION


Sound advice for office acoustics


Mike Carrick of Siderise Group discusses how designers and specifiers can create quieter workspaces, improving privacy and delivering exceptional floor-to-floor, room-to- room sound reductions


well-designed office is an important investment that will attract talent and ensure workers are engaged and productive. With noise being high on the list of annoyances in the workplace and a cause of work- related stress, good acoustic design is a necessity and should be in harmony with interior aesthetics. From the outset it’s important to use materials which will achieve good acoustics and solve any sound transmission issues. Not only must the design satisfy the legislative requirements, it should also meet the client or end user’s ‘wish list’ of acoustic behaviour. Proper acoustics is the key objective for a comfortable environment.


A Reducing cross-talk


The sound separation achieved between adjoining rooms or offices is often severely limited by ‘cross-talk’ via a common void. This common problem occurs when the transmission loss associated with this sound path is less than that provided by the primary separating element, for example, a partition. The voids affected by ‘cross-talk’ include suspended ceiling voids at partitions, access floor voids below partitions and cavities between the floor slab edges and external facades. To effectively reduce sound transmission


or ‘cross-talk’ via hidden voids which sit above office partitions, ceiling void barriers should be installed directly in line with the partition.


The Sound Reduction Index or SRI (Rw) of the cavity barrier is not normally required to equal that of the partition itself. This is due to the presence of other obstructions in the room-to-room sound path such as the suspended ceiling. The individual performance of the barrier need


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


only be sufficient to correct the shortfall between the partition and the untreated cross-talk path.


Suspended ceiling systems The actual value of these paths can vary substantially. For ceiling voids, 15-40 dB Dnfw (DnCw) would usually be associated with most suspended ceiling systems. An acoustic engineer can assess a minimum SRI value for the cavity barrier with knowledge of either the existing overall path value or details of the individual path obstructing elements.


Occasionally conditions arise that demand substantially higher SRI values of the cavity barrier, such as ceiling voids formed by open-cell or substantially perforated suspended ceilings. Twin barrier or multiple element arrangements can then be employed to accommodate almost all possible sound performance criteria. In this situation, Rw values are for the barrier arrangement alone. Room-to-room performance (DnCw) would normally be significantly higher.


Curtains to noise


When you combine the evolving and changing nature of the workplace with modern lightweight construction, such as curtain walls, this can also present a number of challenges when it comes to acoustics.


The overall sound performance in a curtain wall building is effectively controlled by the ‘weakest link’. This means that very careful consideration should be given to any potential weak point to ensure it does not become the ‘limiting factor’ in the overall sound transmission performance. The curtain wall together with the movement joint should all be considered as potential weak points and thoroughly assessed accordingly.


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Acoustic comfort in the built environment has become a concern to society and a challenge to designers


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