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66 INSULATION Making it soundtight


Involved in projects throughout the world and having manufactured acoustic and fire insulation products for more than 40 years, we offer a large range of tried and tested product enhancements specifically developed for both building interiors and the facade industry. From flexible and semi-rigid acoustic barriers for suspended ceilings to acoustic void closures for tops of walls and fire stops for profiled decks, the company’s ceiling void barrier range is designed to effectively reduce sound transmission via hidden voids.


Designed to reduce vertical and horizontal sound transmission in curtain wall buildings, this comprehensive range includes a choice of effective and proven acoustic void barriers and barrier overlays for facades that deal with all common sound path problems and are frequently used to assist in reducing flanking transmission between adjacent internal areas.


Acoustic comfort in the built environment has become a concern to society and a challenge to designers. It is all too common when considering the specification of the seal between the slab edge and the facade, for product selection to be based exclusively in


terms of compliance to the relevant fire regulations. For facade engineers, architects and their clients, it is essential that due consideration is given to both the acoustic implications and performance of the closure arrangement, ensuring any potential weak point in curtain walled buildings is controlled. The cavity seal should ideally always be selected at the design stage because at this point, the largest range of suitable products is potentially available to the designer. Products can therefore be selected based on cost-effectiveness, ease of installation, and acoustic performance. Post or remedial treatment severely limits available product selection. Also it is invariably more expensive, and less practical to install, and may not always be fully compliant.


Often the acoustic design of offices does not receive the attention that most other architectural elements would. A superior acoustic environment should be a given. The use of performance-enhancing products will mitigate against these issues and ensure any potential noise issues are eliminated.


Mike Carrick is head of acoustics at Siderise Group


Icynene – the spray-foam thermal blanket


A well-insulated building means a healthier, quieter and more energy eff icient environment with better comfort levels and lower heating bills.


And nothing does a better job of insulation than Icynene – the first name in spray foam insulation.


Icynene expands 100-fold when applied, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, completely eliminating cold bridging and helping reduce energy bills.


What’s more, its open cell structure lets the building breathe naturally.


Icynene. It’s the modern way to insulate buildings, old and new.


For for more information on the benefits of Icynene visit icynene.co.uk


CE Mark Approval


Certifi cate No 08/4598


ISO 9001


Accepted


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF NOVEMBER 2018


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