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Lanchester Wines


Unlike other countries who have adopted grapes originally indigenous to France or Italy, Tempranillo was born and cultivated in Spain.


And, it’s this Tempranillo grape which gives Rioja wine its distinctive aromas of dried red fruits and mellow spice that so many people know and love with varying blends of Garnacha, Mazuelo and Graciano added by winemakers to create unique blends.


3. Rioja wine doesn’t have to be red While most of us know Rioja as red wine, white wine is also made in the region. White Rioja (Rioja Blanco), is made entirely with white grapes and there are six traditional Spanish grape varieties and three international grapes permitted in its production. The most important grape is Viura, which must be a minimum of 51% of the blend while the others include Garnacha Blanca, Tempranillo Blanco, Malvasia, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Verdejo.


White Rioja offers an elegant, easy drinking and crowd-pleasing white wine, despite making up just 10% of wine production in the Rioja region in Northern Spain. There are two key styles of White Rioja: light, lemony-fresh tangy whites and full-bodied, rich and nutty whites.


4. There are four main classifications of Rioja wine


Rioja uses a system of qualifying wines to make it easy to find what you like.


One of the primary qualifications between the different styles is oak-aging - the more oak, the higher the quality level. And this is strictly regulated by the Consejo Regulador DOCa Rioja (the Rioja control board)


1. Rioja. Wines in their first or second year, which keep their primary freshness and fruitiness.


2. Crianza (Cree-an-tha). A minimum of one year in casks and a few months in the bottle. For white wines, the minimum cask aging period is six months


3. Reserva. Selected wines of the best vintages with an excellent potential that have been aged for a minimum of three years, with at least one year in casks. For white wines, the minimum aging


period is two years, with at least six months in casks.


4. Gran Reserva. Selected wines from exceptional vintages which have spent at least two years in oak casks and three years in the bottle. For white wines, the minimum aging period is four years, with at least one year in casks


If you would like to learn more about Lanchester Wines and its Rioja range, please visit:


www.lanchesterwines.co.uk


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16 OCTOBER 2018


WWW.VENUE-INSIGHT.COM


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